Alta Via 2 Hiking Tour | Italian Dolomites

ALTA VIA 2 HIKING TOUR | ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Pale di san martino alto via 2

The Dolomites “Alta Via” n.2, leads from the Eisack Valley to the ancient town of Feltre. Through the centuries, Feltre became the core of Venetian culture on the border of the alpine mountains. The mountain ranges crossed by the “Alta Via 2” are some of the most famous in the Dolomites. Some peaks appear soft and inviting while others are dignified, haughty and as sharp as the turrets of old medieval castles.  The Plose, Peiterkofel, Púez, Sella, Marmolada Geisler mountain groups are good examples of the former while the Pale di San and the Alpi Feltrine are typical of the latter, with their arching peaks.

This route is divided into 13 stages offering a variety of different landscapes and geological features. The scenery alternates between mountains made of Dolomite rock such as the Peiterkofel, the Geisler, Sella, Pale and Cimònega to limestone mountains such as the Marmolada. Some regions, like the Plose, Púez, Padon, Bocche and Vette are made of a completely different type of rock and have therefore a completely different appearance, offering a strong and picturesque contrast to the Dolomite mountains.

However, it is the large plateaus make this route so special and unique. These plateaus lie between 2000m and 2500m above sea level and the Pale di San Martino measures around 50 km. The plateaus of the Sella, Púez, Zingari and the Vette Feltrine are smaller.

HIKING THE ALTA VIA 2 ROUTE NOTES

STAGE 1: From Bressanone to Rifugio Città di Bressanone-PlöseHütte

  • ELEVATION: gain 1900 m da Bressanone, 435 m da Valcroce, 150 dalla Seggiovia
  • LENGTH: 27 km departing from Bressanone
  • WALK TIME: 6,30 hours by foot from Bressanone
  • TRAILS: 4, 5 and 17
  • DIFFICULTY: E

STAGE 2: From Rifugio Città di Bressanone (Plöse Hütte) to Rifugio Genova (Schlüterhütte)

  • ELEVATION: 500 meters gain; 650 meters descent
  • LENGHT: 15 km
  • WALK TIME: ore 5
  • TRAILS: 4
  • DIFFICULTY: E, short section of fixed trail

STAGE 3: From Rifugio Genova-Schlüterhütte to Rifugio PùezPuezhütte

  • ELEVATION: 850 meters gain; 670 meters descent
  • LENGTH: 15 km
  • WALK TIME: 6 hours
  • TRAILS: 3 and 2
  • DIFFICULTY: EE, short section of fixed trail

STAGE 4: From Rifugio Pùez to Rifugio “Franco Cavazza” al Pisciadù

  • ELEVATION: 570 meters gain; 460 meters descent
  • LENGTH: 10 km
  • WALK TIME: 5 hours
  • TRAILS: 2 and 666
  • DIFFICULTY: EE, short section of fixed trail

STAGE 4: From Rifugio Pisciadù to Rifugio Castiglioni alla Marmolada

  • DIFFICULTY: 750 meters gain; 1280 meters descent
  • LENGTH: 19 km
  • WALK TIME: 6,30 to 7 hours
  • TRAILS: 666, 647, 627, 601
  • DIFFICULTY: EE, section of fixed trail

STAGE 5: From Rifugio Castiglioni alla Marmolada to Passo San Pellegrino

  • ELEVATION: 1100 meters gain; 1200 meters descent
  • LENGTH: 16 km
  • WALK TIME: 7 hours
  • TRAILS: Paved road and trails 610, 689, 694, 670, 607
  • DIFFICULTY: T e E

STAGE 6: From Passo San Pellegrino to Rifugio “Volpi” al Mulàz

  • ELEVATION: 1100 meters gain; 500 meters descent
  • LENGHT: 14 km
  • WALK TIME: 7 hours
  • TRAILS: 658 and 751
  • DIFFICULTY: EE, short section of fixed trail

STAGE 8: From Rifugio “Volpi” to Mulàz al Rifugio “Pedrotti” alla Rosetta

  • ELEVATION: 760 meters gain; 750 meters descent
  • LENGTH: 8 km
  • WALK TIME: 5 hours
  • TRAILS: 703
  • DIFFICULTY: EE e EEA on Sentiero delle Faràngole

STAGE 9: From Rifugio Rosetta to Rifugio Pradidàli and Rifugio Treviso

  • ELEVEATION: 720 meters gain; 1600 meters descent
  • LENGTH: 14 km
  • WALK TIME: 7 hours
  • TRAILS: 702, 715, 709, 711, 707
  • DIFFICULTY: EE with short section of EEA

STAGE 10: From Rifugio Treviso to Passo Ceréda

  • ELEVATION:  1150 meters gain; 900 meters descent
  • LENGTH: 10 km
  • WALK TIME:4,30 hours
  • TRAILS: 718
  • DIFFICULTY: EE

STAGE 11: From Passo Ceréda to Bivacco Feltre “Walter Bodo”  or Rifugio “Bruno Boz”

  • ELEVATION: 1200 meters gain; 600 meters descent
  • LENGHT: 14 km
  • WALK TIME: 6,30 hours
  • TRAILS: 801
  • DIFFICULTY: EE, short section of fixed trail

STAGE 12: From Bivacco Feltre to Rifugio Dal Piaz

  • ELEVATION: 900 meters gain; 650 meters descent
  • LENGHT: 15 km
  • WALK TIME: 7 hours
  • TRAILS: 801
  • DIFFICULTY: EE, short section of fixed trail

STAGE 13: From Rifugio Dal Piaz to Croce d’Àune the down to Feltre

  • LENGTH: 980 meters descent to Croce d’Àune, 1670 meters descent to Feltre
  • LENGTH: 19 km
  • WALK TIME: 6 hours
  • TRAILS: 801 and paved road
  • DIFFICULTY: E e T

ITALIAN DOLOMITES ALTO VIA 2 HIKING TRAIL MAP

alto via 2 map

Alta Via Hiking Tours in the Italian Dolomites

ALTA VIa HIKING TOURS IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Hiking the Alta Vie Trails of the Dolomites of Italy

There's no greater thrill, then to challenge yourself by hiking from one mountain valley to another crossing spectacular summits, or starting at one seashore and biking or walking to another. Hiking the Alte vie (high routes) in the Italian Dolomites is an unforgettable and lifetime experience that is unmatched by walks in any other mountain range.

Hiking the Alte Vie in the Italian Dolomitesis much different then walking Appalachian Trail,Sierra Nevada trails, or the great Alps traverse. Many other walks can be done with very little support other than your, backpack, map, and understanding of where the mountain huts are located. Hiking the upper trails in the Dolomites will also allow you to explore the diverse heritage of the mountain valleys, unique geological history, and food and drink of the region.

Within the Italian Dolomites there are 10 Alta Via routes that are well signposted and maintained. Routes can vary in degree of difficulty and cross different mountain groups where you are exposed to different environments. You can hike the entire route or just do a few days along the route.

Alta Vie Hiking Trails Italian Dolomites

Alta Via 1 - 150 km, 12 Days· This is the classic and easiest route that runs from Lago di Braies, in the Trentino Alto Adige Region, and takes you down to Belluno, in the Veneto Region, you will across the heart of the Italian Dolomites from north to south.

Alta Via 2 - 185 km, 14 Days: Also one of the older classic routes the Alta Via 2 is a bit longer and more difficult then the Alta Via 1. Starting in Bressanone, BZ and running south to Feltre, BL the route is almost all within the Trentino-Alto Adige region.· The route passes over the Putia, Odie-Puez Mountain Group, Sella Mountain Group, Marmolada Mountain Group, Pale di San Martino Mountain Group, and Feltrine Mountain Group of the Italian Dolomites.

Alta Via 3 - 120 km, 10 Days: Also known as Alta Via dei Camosci,route starts in Dobbiaco, Bolzano provinceand ends in Longarone, Belluno Province. The route passes through the Dolomiti di Braies, Cristallo Mountain Group, Sorapiss Mountain Group, Marmarole Mountain Group, Pelmo Mountain Groupand Bosconero mountain group of the Italian Prealps. The route is one of the more difficult.

Alta Via 4 - 90 km, 8 DaysAlta Via di Grohman starts in San Cadido, BZ and ends in Pieve di Cadore, BL in the Veneto.· The route passes through the mountain groups of Tre Cime di Lavaredo, Cadidni di Misurina, Sorapiss Mountain Group, Marmarole Mountain Group, and the Antelao Mountain Group. The route is challenging and has some fixed lines on some sections.

Alta Via 5 - 100 km, 9 Days:· Alta Via di Tiziano connects Sesto, BZ with Pieve di Cadore BL and crosses the Sesto Mountain Group, Marmarole Mountian Group,Sorapiss Mountain Group and Antelao Mountian Group.

Alta Via 6 - 190 km, 14 Days: Also called the Alta Via dei Silenzi this route starts in Sappada, BL and ends in Vittorio Veneto, TVand traverses the d'Oltre Piave Dolomitiand theCarniche of the ItalianPrealps.· The mountains are not as rugged as other routes, but there are long sections that are isolated and not very frequented.

Alta Via 7 - 35 + 75 km, 9 Days: This route is divided into two sections that traverse the Col Nudo andCalallo Mountains of the Italian Prealpsand sections of the Oltre Piave Dolomites and then over to the Col Visentin Mountains down to the Veneto Plain. The first section is very remote.

Alta Via 8 - 160 km, 13 Day: This route was developed to showcase the western Italian Dolomitesand starts inBessanone, BZand ending inSalorno, TO.  This is an easy route that passes through thePutia-Odle Mountain Group, Sciliar Mountian Group, Catinaccio Mountain Group, Latemar Mountain Groupand hills in the d'Ega valley.

Alta Via 9 - 90 km, 12 Days: This is the only alta via that runs west to east, rather than north to south. The route starts inBolzano, BZand ends in Santo Stefano di Cadore, BL crossing the Sciliar Mountain Group, Catinaccio Mountain Group, Sella Mountain Group, Tofane Mountain Group, Cristallo Mountain Group and Sesto Mountain Group.

Alta Via 10 - 115 km, 16 Days: This is the only alta via on the western side of theAdige valley and runs from Bolzano, BZ to Gardone Riviera, BG, on Lake Garda. The route passes through the Mandola, Mountains, The Brenta Mountain Group, and theCadria andCaploner mountains of the Italian Prealps. This route includes the famous fixed cable route, vie ferrata dellaBocchette of the Brenta Mountain Group,the fixed line route can be bypassed.

Alta Via Hiking Trail 1, Italian Dolomites

ALTA VIa 1 HIKING TRAIL ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Hiking the Italia Dolomites
The Italian Dolomites, Alto Via Hiking Route # 1 is a great walk for anyone who loves alpine nature and enjoys backpacking at a moderate altitude without too much danger. It crosses the heart of the Dolomites in its central mountains groups, from Pusteria (in the Bolzano Province of the Trentino Alto Adige Region) to Belluno (in the Belluno Province of the Veneto Region.  The Alto Vie 1 route passes through the Dolomites of Bràies,  Cortina d’Ampezzo, Zoldano, Agordino and Belluno, offering wonderful landscapes and sure to excite.

The northernmost part of this High Route starts from the charming Bràies Lake and goes through the romantic reign of Fanes, as far as the Tofane. Once here, mountain experts will have the opportunity to experience the thrill of safeguarded climbs. Following the easy trail, you will enter the beautiful Zoldo Valley, which pays homage to the regal hugeness of Mt Pelmo.
 Hiking on the Civetta Group offers the grandest views of all the Dolomites. This fantastic itinerary ends in the green Valbelluna.

Be careful: do not undertake this route before thaw, i.e. before the end of June.

Route: fromBraies Lake (in Val Pusteria) to Belluno passing through many of the most spectacular parts of the Dolomite Mountains.
Stages: 12 (can be reduced to 8/9 by skipping some stretches)

Length: 150 km
Days needed to walk: 13 days

Difficulty: Easy

ALTA VIA 1 HIKING TOUR ROUE NOTES

Section 1 - Braies Lake - Rifugio Biella


Three hours and a half walk through an enchanting plateau.
From the rifugio you can easily reach the Croda del Becco peak in an hour and a half walk.

Section 2 - Rifugio Biella - Rifugio Fànes


Four - five hours walk.
From rifugio Fànes, along the "Via della Pace" ("peace route"), you reach the Croda del Valùn Blanch from where you will have an exceptional view of the Tofane and the Val Travenànzes.

Section 3 - Rifugio Fànes - Rifugio Lagazuòi


Five hours walk.
Easy stage which crosses, over the Forcella del Lago, the pass is between Torre del Lago and Cima Scotoni. Once over the peak you work your way downhill to the small Lagazuòi Lake.

Section 4 - Rifugio Lagazuòi - Rifugio Dibona


Three - four hours walk.
Today is a great option for individuals equipped to confront a via ferrata, the Vie Ferrata Lipella is an option The Ferreta is a spectacular 6 hour itinerary which crosses the positions of the First World War and goes downhill to Rifugio Giussani (at Forcella Fontananegra, between the Tofane di Ròzes and di Mezzo).
For less experienced walkers,  make sure you are equipped with a flashlight, can explore the old war tunnel, bore by the Alpine soldiers in July 1916, in Castelletto.

Section 5 - Rifugio Dibona - Rifugio Cinque Torri - Rifugio Nuvolau


Five hours walk.
Today pass near the Cinque Torri is one of the most beautiful rock formation and well known for rock climbing routes.  A great place to lunch and take a break today is at Rifugio Nuvolau, one of the most charming natural balconies in the Dolomites.

Section 6 - Rifugio Nuvolau - Rifugio Palmieri - Rifugio Città di Fiume


Three hours walk.
This itinerary works it way to the foot of Monte Pelmo, one of the first massifs to be climbed at the beginning of the XIX century.

Section 7 - Rifugio Venezia - Rifugio Sonnino al Coldài


Four hours walk.
Excellent walk today to reach Rifugio Coldài, this is one of the most suitable place where to enjoy a romantic sunset on the northern walls of the Civetta Mountain Group, one of the most well-known Dolomites peaks.

Section 8 - Rifugio Sonnino - Rifugio Tissi - Rifugio Vazzolèr


Four - five hours walk.
From the Rifugio, the via ferrata Alleghesi leads to the Civetta peak, while the via Tissi is reserved to walking with good alpine mountain skills. Today you have an excellent view 1.300 metres below Rifugio Tissi where Lake Alleghe sits.


Section 9 - Rifugio Vazzolèr - Rifugio Carestiano


Four hours and a half walk today.

Section 10 - Rifugio Carestiano - Rifugio Pramperèt


Four - five hours walk.

Section 11 - Rifugio Pramperèt - Rifugio 7° alpini


From ten to twelve hours.
This is the longest stage which winds among rocky landscapes and the green mountain pastures in Val Vescovà.

Section 12 - Rifugio 7° alpini – Belluno


Two - three hours walk. 
Easy stage which winds along the Val D'Ardo to reach your final destination at Belluno

Alta Via Hiking Trail 5 (Titian's Trial), Italian Dolomites

ALTA VIA 5 HIKING TOUR ITALIAN DOLOMITES

dolomites-italy-1

Alta Via n. 5 hiking trail is dedicated to the artist Titian, who used images of the Marmarole mountain, that is a sub section of the Antelao Mountain Group. to enrich the background of his pictures.  A good portion of this trail crosses the Marmarole Mountain, therefore it is a fitting name.

  • Start Point (North): Sesto di Pusteria
  • Finish Point (South): Pieve di Cadore
  • N. Stages: 7 
Lenght: 100 km 

  • Average Time To Walk: 10 days

  • Difficulty Level: PD/medium

ALTA VIA 5 HIKING TOUR ROUTE NOTES

"Titian’s High Route", from Sesto in Pusteria to Pieve di Cadore, can be divided into 3 parts, which corresponds to the main mountain groups you cross; Croda dei Tòni and the Popèra; second, the Marmaròle; third, the Antelao. On the Croda dei Toni and on the Antelao the route follows trails that are not particularly difficult for a trained hiker and that are always well equipped in case of dangerous passages.
Instead, however extraordinary and unique, the Marmarole present greater difficulty given by isolation, a great difference in height and fog.

KEY CHECKPOINTS AND RIFUGI OF THE ALTA VIA 5 ROUTE

Rifugio Zsigmondy Comici - Rifugio Giosuè Carducci
Three hours and a half walk.
From Sesto (1316 mt) reach by car, (towards San Giuseppe di Moso), Campo Fiscallino (Dolomitenhof - 1454 m). Leave the car and enter the dirt road to Capanna di Fondovalle (Talschlusshütte - 1548m) and, (following the path n. 103), reach Rifugio Zsigmondy Comici (2224 m), at the foot of the northern wall of the Croda dei Toni (Zwölferkofel) and the eastern slope of the Cima Undici (Elferkofel).

Walk along the Lago Ghiacciato, through the scree of the Croda dei Toni, and reach the Rifugio Giosuè Carducci where, in summer it is possible to overnight (34 beds - booking recommended)

For those who desire to stay in on of the two rifugio of this stage, the excursions to Croda dei Tòni Tour (height hours and a half, starting point and arrival Rifugo Zsigmondy Comici) and the Pòpera Tour (13 hours, with overnight possibility at Rifugio al Popèra-Antonio Berti -booking recommended- or at Rifugio Selvapiana-Italo Lunelli; starting point and arrival at Rifugo Zsigmondy Comici or Rifugio Giosuè Carducci)

Rifugio Giosuè Carducci - Ponte da Rin in Val Ansièi
Three hours walk. If you want to reach Rifugio Ciareìdo it will take eight hours and a half.
This easy stretch allows to visit the nice town of Auronzo di Cadore. Here several structures can offers many overnight possibilities.
  More trained hikers can link the second o the third stage and reach Rifugio Ciarèido or Rifugio Baiòn-Boni (eight hours and a half from Rifugio Carducci).

Ponte da Rin in Val Ansièi - Rifugio Ciarèido o Rifugio Baion-Boni
Five hours and a half walk.
Majestic panorama on the eastern Dolomites and on those beyond Val d'Ansièi.
Interesting excursions to the Rifugi per il Monte Agùdo.

Rifugio Ciarèido o Rifugio Baion-Boni - Bivacco Rifugio Tiziano
Six hours and a half walk.
In this stage the ferrata "Sentiero degli Alpini" is included (excellently restored ex-novo by the Alpine guides in 1989), and made by a series of metal ropes which lead the excursionist, without any particular difficulties to forcella Giau de la Tana (2650 m). Majestic panorama on the Popèra, Cadìni and the Tre Cime di Lavaredo.
Also in this stage, expert Alpine guides can suggest many interesting excursions.

Bivacco Rifugio Tiziano - Bivacco Musatti - Bivacco Voltolìna
This stage takes nine hours walk and is proposed in only one stage. However, excursionists can divide it as they like it, considering the bivouacs availability too.

Bivacco Voltolìna - Rifugio San Marco - Rifugio Galassi
Four hours and a half walk.
This stage sees an increasing exposure, but the path is good and well equipped in the most binding stretches. Metal ropes and short equipped stretches (often covered with snow) requires a minimum mountaineering experience.
Alpine guides, very often give changes which allow to reach the rifugio San Marco and Galassi skipping the Cèngia del Doge. 
From Rifugio Galassi it is then possible to reach, through a not difficult but long route, the Antelao peak (3264 m). The climb is recommended, but it takes a whole day.

Rifugio Galassi - Rifugio Antelao - Pieve di Cadore
Seven hours and a half walk.
Interesting and not tiring excursion which allow to plunge in the heart of the Dolomites.

Bike Tour Passo Brocon in the Italian Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO BROCON | DOLOMITES

Passo Brocon Dolomites

PassoBrocon is located in the Trento Province and links Valsugana with Fiera di Primero.  The road passes over the Lagorai mountain group.  This is a nice remote route to ride, and there are some stunning views.

Passo Brocon, Dolomites Map

There are two routes up to Passo Brocon, the road coming from Val Sugana and from Imer.

Passo Brocon Riding the Climb from Grigno

  • Length: 18.5 km
  • Average grade: 5.4%

From Imer

  • Length: 26.7 km
  • Average grade: 4.7%

Bike Tour Passo Cereda in the Italian Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO CEREDA | DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Italy, Passo Cereda Dolomites

Passo Cereda divides the Trento and Belluno provinces in northern Italy and is one of the lesser known climbs of the Dolomites, but an excellent route that has less traffic then some of the better know passes to the north.   The mountain pass links Fiera di Primiero with the Agordo valley

There are three routes up to Passo Cereda. For me the best ride is from Fiera di Primiero, an 8.4 km climb with an average grade of 9%.  The ride over the pass from Agordo is 3 times as long but an easy ride that makes a loop route over Passo Rolle and Passo Valles back to Agordo an excellent day.

Passo Ceredo Dolomites Map

 

From Fiera di Primiero:

  • Province: Trento
  • Length: 8.4 km
  • Average grade: 9%
  • Difficulty: 100.66

 

From Ponte Mas

  • Province: Belluno
  • Length: 35.5 km
  • Average grade: 2.8%
  • Difficulty: 78.22

Bike Tour Passo Duran | Italian Dolomite

BIKE TOURING PASSO DURAN | ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Passo Duran

Passo Duran passes through southern cliffs of the Civetta Mountain group and is located in the Belluno province of the Veneto region. The Duran Pass is a classic part of the Dolomite loop rides or it is a very good over and back ride from Agordo.  If you are planning a ride in the Dolomites the best ride up to Passo Duran is from Agordo and descenting to Dont.

 Passo Duran Dolomites Map

The best way to ride Passo Duran is to base yourself in Agordo, Arabba, Cortina, or Belluno and make a loop ride.  A great day of riding if you are unsupported is to ride over and back from Agordo. 

There are two roads to bike to reach the passo Duran

Bike Tour Passo Duran from Agordo Bike Tour

  • Belluno Province
  • Length: 12.5 km
  • Average grade: 7.9%
  • Difficulty: 128.88

Bike Tour Passo Duran from Dont

  • Belluno Province
  • Length:  8.16 km
  • Average grade: 7.9%
  • Difficulty:  102.14

Bike Tour Passo Duran Descent to Dont

Bike Tour Passo Falzarego in the Italian Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO FALZAREGO | DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Italy, Passo Falzarego Dolomite's

Passo di Falzarego, 2.105 m above the sea level, is a high mountain pass in the Belluno Province, Veneto Region. It mainly connects Andráz and Cortina d'Ampezzo. Site of WWI battles and flanked by the Tofane Mountain group. The Pass is a classic if you are making the loop ride over Passo Giau from Alleghe or Cortina d'Ampezzo.   There are two sides to ride, but I recommend the descent from Passo Falzarego to Capria, this is one of the best downhills rides in the Dolomites.

To arrive to the summit, starting from Cortina, the Passo Falzarego ascent is 16.4 km long. Over this distance, you climb 913 meters. The average percentage is thus 5.6 %. And starting from Caprile, the Passo Falzarego ascent is 20.46 km long. Over this distance, you climb 1119 meters. The average percentage is thus 5.5 %.


Passo Falzarego Dolomites, Map

 

Bike Tour Passo di Falzarego From Cortina:

  • Belluno Province
  • Length: 16.4 km
  • Average grade: 5.6%
  • Diffiuclty: 100.79

Bike Tour Passo di Falzarego from Caprile

  • Belluno Province
  • Length:  20.46
  • Average grade: 5.5%
  • Difficulty: 11.83

Bike Tour Passo Gardena in the Italian Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO GARDENA | DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Passo Gardena, Italian Dolomites

Passo Gardena is located in the Sella group of the Dolomite's and is one of the 4 Passes riding in the Marathon di Dolomiti each year and one of the most recommended rides to do for its beauty.  You normally would not want to ascend or descent from the St. Christina area due to the traffic.  That road is the tour bus road to bring everyone up to see the Dolomiti. 

passo-gardena-map1

There are three roads to ride to Passo Gardena

From Chiusa:Try to time yourself to be riding during low traffic. 

  • Length: 37.6 km
  • Average grade: 4.3%
  • Difficulty: 134.52

From Ponte Gardena

  • Length: 31.9 km
  • Average grade: 5.2%
  • Difficulty: 149.66

From Corvara

  • Length: 9.6 km
  • Average grade: 6.2%
  • Difficulty: 82.98

Bike Tour Passo Lavasè in the Italian Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO LAVASE | DOLOMITES

Passo Lavase Bike Italy

Passo Lavasè is located in the Latemar group of the Dolomiti and along the Trento Province and Bolzano Province boarder.  A great ride that very few individuals actually come over to ride. 

Passo Lavase Dolomites, Map

There are two roads to ride to Passo Lavasè

From Ponte Nova

  • Length: 12..2 km
  • Average grade: 7.7%
  • Difficulty: 122.89

From Cavalese

  • Length: 10.7 km
  • Average grade: 7.5%
  • Difficulty: 108.29

The road Tesero links in to the Cavalese ascent just after the turn off to Pampeago ski resort and a finish point in the 2012 Giro d'Italia.

Bike Tour Passo Nigra in the Italian Dolomites

PASSO NIGRA | DOLOMITES

Passo Nigra bike tour

Passo Nigra is a pass located in the Catinaccio Mountian Group (Rosengarten) of the Italian Dolomites and is a great alternative route to ride (instead of Passo Costalunga) during the summer months to get from the city of Bolzano to the Fassa Valley. 

 Passo Nigra Dolomites, Map

From Prato al'Isarco

  • Length: 24.4 km
  • Average grade: 5.6%
  • Difficulty: 128.94

From Vigo di Fasso

  • Length: 10 km
  • Average grade: 6 %
  • Difficulty:

Bike Tour Passo S. Pellegrino in the Italian Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO SAN PELLEGRINO | DOLOMITES

Passo S. Pellegrino Bike

Ride that connects the Fassa Valley of Trentino with the valley Agordina in the Veneto and has the Marmolada mountains on the north and the Pala di S. Martino to the south.

Passo San Pellegrino Dolomites, Map

The two primary routes from Moena and Falcade are both great rides up to the Passo Pellegrino. Coming from Falcade is the more challenging ride with ramps up to 15% and there is a tunnel you should ride around, using a service road. The route coming up from Moena is not as stiff of a ride but there tends to be traffic on the weekends.

Bike Tour Italy's Passo San Pellegrino: Riding the Climb from Cencenighe

From Falcade:

  • Length: 9.01 km
  • Average grade: 8.6%
  • Difficulty: 119.76

From Moena:

  • Length: 11.41 km
  • Average grade: 6.8%
  • Difficulty: 100.83

Bike Tour Passo Staulanza in the Italian Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO STAULANZA | ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Passo Staulanza, Dolomites

Passo Staulanza, at an elevation of 1773m. above the sea level, is a high mountain pass in the Dolomites in the Belluno Province of the Veneto Region. It connects the Zoldo valley in the south and the Cadore valley in the north.

Passo Staulanza summit is located in a small valley between Mount Coldai (2.395m), of the Civetta Mountain Group, and the Pelmo (3.168m) mountain, Pelmo Mountain Group, with a little restaurant and a parking lot.

Passo Stalanza Dolomites

Passo Stulanza from Dont Bike Climb

  • Length: 12.4 km
  • Average Grade: 6.8%
  • Max Grade: 11%

Bike Tour Passo Staulanza from Selva di Cadore

  • Length: 9 km
  • Average Grade:
  • Max Grade:

 

Bike Tour Passo Valles in the Italian Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO VALLES | DOLOMITES

Passo Valles Bike Tour

Passo Valles links Passo San Pellegrino with Passo Rolle or the descent down to Predazzo.

Passo Valles Dolomites, Map

 

The actual difficulty of this ride depends on your departure point and distance to travel during the day.

From Paneveggio

  • Length: 6 km
  • Average grade: 8.2%
  • Diffculty: 89.63

From Falcade Alto

  • Length: 7.3 Km
  • Average grade: 8.7%
  • Difficulty: 108.18
  • ·

Bike Tour Passo Valles Riding the Climb from Cencenighe

PASSO VALLES FROM CENCENIGHE BIKE CLIMB | DOLOMITES

Passo Valles Dolomites

BIKE PASSO VALLES FROM CENCENIGHE

Passo Valles Dolomites Bike Profile

REGION Veneto Region
PROVINCE Belluno Province
START POINT Cencenighe
LENGTH 19.8 km
ELEVATION AT START 773 meters a.s.l.
MAX ELEVATION 2053 meters a.s.l.
ELEVATION GAIN 1180 meters
AVERAGE GRADE 7.5%
MAX GRADE 16%
TIME TO RIDE 1:50 hours

Bike Tour Pian della Fugazze Riding the Climb From Schio Bike Tour

PIAN DELLA FUGAZZE BIKE CLIMB FROM VALLE DEL PASUBIO | DOLOMITES

Bike Touring Italy's Pian delle Fugazze

In the Vicenza Province sits Piccolo Dolomite mountains that were part of the battle lines of the First World War. Now in more modern times these same mountain roads that were once used to carry supplies to troops on Pasubio and the passes to Trento, have become part of the history of cycling.

Bike Tour Italy's Pian delle Fugazze

Many heroic climbs and adventures have been made up these epic climbs, one of the most famous was made by Gino Bartali, on the route from Schio to Pian della Fugazze.  The actual climb is 11 km in length and starts just before the last township of Valli del Pasubio.  The climb starts at a gentle grade but soon the game is on and as the incline increases.  Not one of the hardest climbs in the area, but this challenging endeavour will leave a lasting impression on the biking soul.

Riding in the area around Mt.Pasubio is like opening a history book.  Prior to 1918, this mountain mass marked the frontier between the Republic of Italyand the Austrian-Hungarian Empire.  During the Great War numerous trails and roads were carved in the mountains in order to move troops to the front.  One of these roads now leads us up to Pain della Fugazze a great itinerary for cyclist as well as a wealth of cultural and natural attractions for the visitors. In the area you can climb some of the classic climbs of the Piccolo Dolomites, go horse back riding, hike the 52 tunnels of Pasubio utilized to re-supply troops during the war, mountain bike trails, or just relax and enjoy the fresh mountain air.

GETTING TO THE CLIMB

BY TRAIN: You can get to Schio by train from Vicenza, from Schio it is 23 km to the pass.  The first section of the road tends to have some traffic and trucks.  After you get to Valli dei Pasubio the traffic very light and this is also where the climb starts. 

 

Bike Tour Pian Fugazze

REGION Veneto Region
PROVINCE Vicenza Province
MOUNTAIN GROUP Piccolo Dolomites
DEPARTURE POINT Valli del Pasubio
DISTANCE 11.5 km
START ELEVATION
350 meters a.sl.
MAXIMUM ELEVATION
1162 meters a.s.l.
ELEVATION GAIN 812 meters
AVERAGE GRADE
7.1 %
MAXIMUM GRADE
14 %
TIME TO RIDE  
Athetic Beginner 1 hour 21 minutes
Cyclist Tourist 1 hour 01 minutes
Amateur Cyclist 44 minutes
Professional Cyclist 35 minutes

The last time the Giro d'Italia used this climb was in 2007

Bike Touring Italy's Pian delle Fugazze

Bike Tour the Italian Dolomites and Passo Stelvio

BIKE TOURING THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES AND STELVIO PASS

Photo of Passo Stelvio in the Italian Alps

Bike Tour Italy's Dolomitesisone of cycling most spectacular adventures.  During this Bike Tour I take you on a route that lets you challenge yourself on the TOP Climbs in Italian Cycling History riding in the Dolomites and Italian Alps.  Each day's route plan is organized to be enjoyable rides though one of the World's UNESCO Monuments, with plenty of options to ride extra miles.

Italy's Dolomites Mountains offers some of the best mountain roads in Europe to bike tour on. The Dolomites are well developed, and the region is famous for it’s valleys and towns that come alive with après-ski fever each winter and hikers in the summer.  Offering great rides for all level of cyclist the Dolomites should be a must ride on all bike riders bucket list.  You can go for time or just relaxing rides for stunning views, either way we have a developed program that allows you to explore the area safely.

During the Italian Dolomites and Passo Stelvio Bike Tour week, we ride through the heart of the Dolomite's exploring many of the best know mountain passes that have been used for great races, for years. In addition, we ride 2 of the classic passes of the Alps, Passo Stelvio and Passo Gavia. During the week we enjoy great climbs, good food and wine, and fun company during a week of climbing while exploring the National Monument of the World.

For more information and detailed route information Contact Us.

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Italian Dolomites and Passo Stelvio Bike Tour DETAILS
 
Length 8 days 7 nights (7 riding days)
Mileage base routes are 40 - 60  km, Average Elevation Gain per day 1200 meter, Average % Grade -7%

Single supplement
Meals: All breakfasts, 3 dinners
Start - Venice Marco Polo Airport

Finish -Milano Airport

This trip can be organized as a private trip or a Self Guided Tour.  Contact me to schedule a trip date.

BIKE TOUR ITALY - THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES AND ALPS AT A GLANCE

  • Saturday - Pick Up at Venice Airport and move to Agordo at the base of the Dolomites
  • Sunday - Passo Duran- Passo Stalunza - to Selva di Cadore (68 km, 2000 meters)
  • Monday -Passo Giau - Passo Falzarego - Covara (52 km, 1900 meters)
  • Tuesday - 4 Passes of the Sella Mountain Group -Covara (50 km, 1904 meters)
  • Wednesday - Passo Gardena - Passo Sella - Passo Costalunga (72 km, 2100 meters)
  • Thursday - Passo Stelvio - Bormio (48 km, 2100 meters)
  • Friday - Passo Gavia - (Optional Passo Mortirolo) - Bormio (74 km, 2100 meters)
  • Saturday - Arriverdici ( Transfer to Milano Train Station)

Each ride can be lengthened, or shorten based on rider preference.  All routes are on secondary roads.

Bike Touring Croce d'Aune | Dolomites

BIKE TOURING CROCE D'AUNE | DOLOMITES

Passo Croce d'Aune Dolomites

The Croce d’Aune is a mountain pass, at an elevation of 1.015m above the sea level, located in the Feltre Mountain Group of the Dolomites, in the province of Belluno (Italy).

Passo Croce d'Aune is a small pass just north of Feltre, located in Belluno Province, Veneto Region. This mountain pass was once the main route of communication between Feltre and the Cismon Valley. Now a tunnel and road has been constructed, resulting in this special spot being forgotten. There are lots of hiking paths starting from the passo Croce d'Aune, and this happens to be the start point of the Belluno Dolomiti National Park.



Passo Croce d'Aune is the site, where Tullio Campagnolo (from Vicenza) had the inspiration to develop the skewer (quick release) for the bike wheel. He was racing across the pass in the 1920's and due to bad weather and cold Campagnolo had trouble taking off this back wheel to change a flat. On November 11th, 1927, with snow covering the roads of the Croce D'Aune Campagnolo needed to remove his rear wheel to change gears. Because the large wingnuts that held his wheel on had frozen, and his hands were too cold to budge them, he was unable to remove his wheel to change gears, and lost his chance at victory that day.



As he struggled to free his wheel, he muttered five words to himself that changed the history of cycling: 
"Bisogno cambiá qualcossa de drio!"  ("Something must change in the rear!") and that simple event -- a wheel that couldn't be removed -- started Campagnolo thinking. He went back to his workshop, and emerged with the invention of the quick-release lever (in 1930) and, soon after, an early bicycle derailleur (1933).

Passo Croce d'Aune Dolomites

Bike Tour Passo Croce D'Aune from Ponte d'Oltra

  • Length:
  • Average Grade:
  • Max Grade:

Bike Tour Passo Croce d'Aune from Feltre

 

Bike Touring Passo Campolongo | Italian Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO CAMPOLONGO | DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Italy, Passo Campolongo Dolomites


Passo Campolongo is one of the  4 passes of the Sella Mountain Group in the Italian Dolomites, this pass is crossed each year by bike riders and skiers in the winter.  Passo Campolongo is one of the climbs included the Dolomiti Maratone each year, and the route on every cyclist bucket list for riding in the Dolomite's.

There are two roads leading up to Passo Campolongo, one from Corvara and the other from Arabba.  There is always a debate on weather the clockwise or counter clockwise route, for the 4 passes, is hardest.  I have enjoyed riding the route both directions and feel the clock wise route is a more exciting and visual route, and the counter clockwise route is the harder ride. 

passo-campolungo-map

 

From Arabba:

  • Belluno Province
  • Length: 4 km
  • Average grade: 7.4%
  • Difficulty: 64.1

 

From Corvara in Badia

  • Alto-Adige Province
  • Length:  9.46 km
  • Average grade: 3.5%
  • Difficulty: 48.52

Bike Touring Passo Fedaia | Italian Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO FEDAIA | DOLOMITES

Photo of Marmolada Mountains in the Dolomites of Italy

Passo Fedaia is one of the highest paved passes you can ride in the Dolomites and a great climb and challenge. The ride takes you over the Marmolada Mountain Group of the Italian Dolomites (Monte Marmolada is the tallest of the Dolomite's) and past Lago di Fedaia, formed by one of the tallest dams in Italy, this is the site of the opening scene, of the movie "The Italian Job". The best side to ride is from Caprile, the road is quite and well paved.  The Canazei side tends to have more day traffic of tourists coming up to see the Dam and Lake, there are also a few tunnels to ride through. This is a great loop ride if you are staying in Arabba, Canazei, or Alleghe making your day a nice 50 mile day of riding.  Otherwiseit canberode as part of a transition day to move to another part of the Dolomites.

Passo Fedaia Dolomites Map

There are two routes up to Passo Fedàia.

Bike Touring Passo Fedaia From Caprile (the most challenging route)

  • Length: 14.1 km
  • Average %: 7.5%
  • Difficulty: 133.02

From Canazei

  • Length: 14 km
  • Average grade: 4.4%
  • Difficulty: 70.52

Bike Touring Passo Giau | Dolomite's

BIKE TOURING PASSO GIAU | Italian DOLOMITES

Passo Giau Italian Dolomites

Passo Giau is located in the Belluno Province, of Veneto Region.Passo Giau separates the peaks of the Croda da Lago and Averau mountains, which are part of the Pelmo Dolomite Group.  The pass sits above the Cortina to the north and the Agordo valley to the south west.

Passo Giau is one of the best bike rides in the Italian Dolomites.  The route is challenging so you need good legs or great gearing, with some sections reaching 15% it is considered one of 'THE' rides to do within cycling.  The pass is included in the 2012 Giro d'Italia and a must do ride, plus the views at the top are not to be missed.The best places to base yourself is either Cortina or Alleghe.  I like Alleghe since it gives you more flexibility to more rides during your stay.  Cortina is good for riding Tre Cime di Laverado and the classic Passo Giau loop but then you would need to re-ride the same routes to get to other classic climbs.  Alleghe on the other hand is in the perfect position to ride the Giau, Duran Staulanza, 4 passes Padoi, Sella, Gardena, and Campolungo, plus Passo Fadia, and S. Pelligrino. 

For me the best route to ride the pass is from the southwest side that starts at Colle Lucia or Selva di Christina.  This route is the same utilized in the Giro d'Italia and considered the harder and classic way.  Coming from Pocòl on the Cortina side is a nice ride but you do not have the same openness and dynamic scenery to enjoy.

Passo Giau Map

BIKE TOURING ROUTES TO REACH PASSO GIAU:

Bike Touring Passo Gaiu Riding the Climbing Pocol (and Cortina):

  • Belluno Province
  • Length: 8.6 km
  • Average grade: 8.3%
  • Difficulty: 113.77

Bike Tour Passo Giau Riding the Climb from Caprile

  • Belluno Province
  • Length: 10.12 km
  • Average grade: 9.1%
  • Difficulty: 142.8

Bike Touring Passo Pordoi | Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO PORDOI | DOLOMITES

Photo of Passo Pordoi in the Italian Dolomites

Passo Pordoi is and has often been part of several important bike races, like the Giro d’Italia.  At the pass there is the Fausto Coppi monument, showing the importance of the area to Italian Cycling. In the summer Passo Pordoi is a starting point for high-level walks, via ferrate, and easy excursions for the whole family, such as the "Viel dal Pan", an ancient path that was used by merchants to reach Veneto or Trentino.

To get the summit, starting from Canazei, the Passo Pordoi ascent is 13 km long. Over this distance, you climb 786 meters. The average percentage is thus 6 %. And starting from Arabba, the Passo Pordoi ascent is 9.4 km long. Over this distance, you climb 637 meters.

The other passes in the area that Passo Pordoi can be linked to for a great ride are Passo Sella, Passo Gardena, Passo Campolongo, Passo Valparola, Passo Fedaia.

BIKE TOURING ROUTES UP TO PASSO PORDOI

 

Bike Touring Passo Sella | Dolomites

BIKE TOURING PASSO SELLA | DOLOMITES

bike touring passo sella

Passo Sella is part of the famous 4 passes rides or Sellarounda Bike Tour, and should be on a cyclist must do list when considering a tour of Italy.  Located in the Italian Dolomites the pass sits along the main Dolomite road.  You have two routes to ride up to the pass from the northern valley of the Gardena or south from Val del Femme.  I find the ride up from the southern slopes to be one of the sections for stunning views. 

Map of the Sella Mountains

BIKE TOURING ROUTES UP TO THE SELLA PASS OF THE DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Passo Sella Riding the Climb from Passo Pordoi Intersection

Bike Touring The Classic Climbs of the Dolomites and Alps | Italy

BIKE TOURING THE CLASSIC CLIMBS OF THE DOLOMITES AND ALPS

passo sella

Bike Tour Italy's Dolomites and Alps is one of cycling's most spectacular adventures.  During this Italy Bike Tour the route is designed to allow you to challenge yourself on the TOP Climbs in Italian Cycling History.  Each day's route plan is organized to be enjoyable rides though one of the World's UNESCO Monuments, with plenty of options to ride extra miles.

Italy's Dolomites Mountains offers some of the best mountain roads in Europe to bike tour on. The Dolomites are well developed, and the region is famous for it’s valleys and towns that come alive with après-ski fever each winter and hikers in the summer.  Offering great rides for all level of cyclist the Dolomites should be a must ride on all bike riders bucket list.  You can go for time or just relaxing rides for stunning views, either way we have a developed program that allows you to explore the area safely.

During the Italian Dolomites Bike Tour week, you ride through the heart of the Dolomite's exploring many of the best know mountain passes that have been used for great races, for years. Enjoy great climbs, good food and wine, and fun company during a week of climbing while exploring the National Monument of the World.

For more information and detailed route information connect us via email.

BIKE TOUR ITALY - THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES AND ALPS AT A GLANCE

Saturday - Venice Airport and move to Agordo at the base of the Dolomites
Sunday - Passo Duran - Passo Stalunza - to Selva di Cadore (68 km, 2000 meters)
Monday -Passo Gaiu - Passo Falzarego - Covara (52 km, 1900 meters)
Tuesday - 4 Passes of the Sella Mountain Group - Covara (50 km, 1904 meters)
Wednesday - Passo Gardena - Passo Sella - Passo Costalunga (72 km, 2100 meters)
Thursday - Passo Stelvio - Bormio (48 km, 2100 meters)
Friday - Passo Gavia - (Optional Passo Mortirolo) - Bormio (74 km, 2100 meters)
Saturday - Arriverdici ( Transfer to Milano Train Station)

Each ride can be lengthened, or shorten based on rider preference.  All routes are on secondary roads.

The Dolomites are featured each year in the Giro d'Italia, which has become known as the 'The World's Hardest Race, In the World's Most Beautiful Place',

Bike Touring the Italian Dolomites Classic Climbs

BIKE TOURING THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

bike dolomites

The Dolomites of Italy offers some of the best cycle touring in Europe with a large varity of climbs and valley routes to select from.  The scenary you will discover during your rides is spectacular and unqiue to the Dolomites.  There are many great rides and options to consider when you plan your trip, below are few tips to get you started.

WHEN TO BIKE TOUR THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

The best time to ride the Dolomites is during the months of June, July, August, and September.  You can also ride in late May and October but you will find most of the hotels closed. Also there is usually snow on the passes thorough the later weeks of May and always a good chance it can snow while you are there. Always make sure you have a full kit because weather can change quickly.  For multi pass rides it is best to utilize a support vehicle.

WHAT YOU NEED FOR A BIKE TRIP IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

When you are planning your bike tour to the Italian Dolomites remember that weather can always change and should have multi layered kit. The best way to tour the Dolomites is to have a support vehicle so you can dress up and down as needed.  There are plenty of water sources along the roads so one bottle on the bike is enough but two bottles will be useful on hotter days.

You should ride your own bike anytime for the best comfort, and when riding the classic climbs it is even more important because you should be more familar with the way the bike handles.  Most cyclist will be most comfortable riding a compac gear set up with a 50/34 in the front and a 12-29 on the rear cog.  Most of the climbs are around 12 km or less and with average grades over 6%. You will find lots of short sections of 12 to 18 percent on many of the better known climbs.  Riders who are visiting while not in the best riding shape can consider using Mountain Bike gearing and do less climbs per day and still have a wonder riding experience.

WHERE TO BASE YOURSELF TO BIKE TOUR THE DOLOMITES

The Dolomites are located in the Veneto Region and Trentino Alto Adige Region.  Many bike tour operates combine rides in the Dolomites and Passo Stelvio, which is in the Italian Alps. This creates a dead space or long transfer between riding areas, if ybut the best rides in in the Dolomites you can base yourself in Arabba, Alleghe, or Covara.

BIKE TOURING LOCATIONS IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

bike touring passo pordoiBIKE TOURING PASSO PORDOI

bike touring passo sella

BIKE TOURING PASSO SELLA

bike touring passo gardena

BIKE TOURING PASSO GARDENA

bike touring passo campolongo

BIKE TOURING PASSO CAMPOLONGO

bike touring passo duran

BIKE TOURING PASSO DURAN

bike touring passo staulanza

BIKE TOURING PASSO STAULANZA

passo giau

BIKE TOURING PASSO GIAU

bike touring passo falzarego

BIKE TOURING PASSO FALZAREGO

bike touring passo fedaia

BIKE TOURING PASSO FEDAIA

bike touring passo san pellegrino

BIKE TOURING PASSO SAN PELLEGRINO

bike touring passo cereda

BIKE TOURING PASSO CEREDA

bike touring passo brocon

BIKE TOURING PASSO BROCON

passo costalungo

BIKE TOURING PASSO COSTALUNGA (KARERPASS)

 bike touring passo croce d'aune

BIKE TOURING PASSO CROCE D'AUNE

bike touring passo manghen

BIKE TOURING PASSO MANGHEN

bike touring passo rolle

Brenta Mountain Group | Dolomites

Guide to the Dolomites

Brenta Mountain Group

Italiaoutdoors guide to the Brenta Dolomites

The Brenta Dolomites (‘Dolomiti di Brenta’ in Italian) are in the westernmost extremity of the Dolomites region, in the Trento Province of the Trentino Adige Adgie Region. The Brenta Group is on the western side of the Adige valley, and bordered on the west by the Giudicarie fault-line; a tectonic fracture that marks the separation between the Dolomites and the Adamello (3,539 m) and Presanella (3,558 m) groups of the Italian Alps, which border the area to the north and west respectively. The range runs north to south for about 40 km and is about 12 km wide east to west. This  Brenta Group consists of calcareous and Dolomite rocks, displays majestic but austere forms with sharp angles of varied shapes. Various processes of erosion have shaped the massive banks of Main Dolomite bedrock, carving out the bold and agile pinnacles which form the heart of the Brenta Dolomites, in front of Cima Tosa (the highest elevation; 3,173 m) and the Campanil Alto (‘Upper Bell Tower’), at the top of the Brenta valley.The Campanil Basso (literally ‘Lower Bell Tower’) is a tower formation that best represents the beauty of the Group and inspired mountaineers and enthusiasts who have come to the area.

TOWNS OF THE LAGORAI GROUP Madonna di Campiglio Pinzolo Molveno Cles Trento Pagnella

Need Help Planning A Trip To Italy

Italy is one of the most diverse places in the world to visit but there is more to the country then Venice, Florence, Roma, Cinque Terre and a couple of other top attractions.  If you plan you days well and understand how to move around within the country you can a great cost effective vacation full of activity, history, culture, and great food and wine.  Contact us to get the insights to travel in Italy.  We offer: Travel Consultant- book time online for a web chat to answer your questions about traveling in Italy. Travel Planning - need help outlining and planning your adventure in Italy. Scheduled Tours - each month we lead a scheduled tour for those looking to join a small group to explore. Travel support:  Bike Touring - routes, bike rental, bag transfers.  Walking/Hiking Tours - routes, bag transfers. Booking assistance and suggested contacts.

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Main Peaks of the Brenta Group

Cima Brenta (3,150 m) Crozzon di Brenta (3,118 m) Cima Vallesinella (3,114 m) Cima d’Ambiez (3,102 m) Cima Mandron (3,040 m) Cima Falkner (2,999 m) Cima Vallon (2,968 m) Cima Brenta Alta (2,960 m) Cima Agola (2,959 m) Cima d’Armi (2,951 m) Campanile Alto (or ‘di Brenta’; 2,937 m) Campanile Basso (2,883 m).

Mountain Huts in the Brenta Group

Rifugio Croz dell'Altissimo, 1.430 m Rifugio Selvata, 1.630 m Rifugio Stoppani al Grostè Rifugio Graffer al Grostè, 2.261 m Rifugio Tuckett, 2.272 m Rifugio Brentei, 2.182 m Rifugio Angelo Alimonta, 2.580 m Rifugio Tommaso Pedrotti, 2.491 m Rifugio Silvio Agostini, 2.405 m Rifugio Dodici Apostoli, 2.487 m

Croce d'Aune | Dolomites

CROCE D'AUNE | DOLOMITES

Passo Croce d'Aune Dolomites

The Croce d’Aune is a mountain pass, at an elevation of 1.015m above the sea level, located in the Feltre Mountain Group of the Italian Dolomites, in the Belluno Provinceof the Veneto Region.

Passo Croce d'Aune is a small pass just north of the town of Feltre, located in Belluno Dolomite National Park. This mountain pass was once the main route of communication between Feltre and theCismon Valley. Now a tunnel and road has been constructed, resulting in this special spot being forgotten. There are lots of hiking paths starting from the Passo Croce d'Aune, and this happens to be the start point of the for many Italian Dolomites walks.



Passo Croce d'Aune is the site, where Tullio Campagnolo (from Vicenza) had the inspiration to develop the skewer (quick release) for the bike wheel. He was racing across the pass in the 1920's and due to bad weather and cold Campagnolo had trouble taking off this back wheel to change a flat. On November 11th, 1927, with snow covering the roads of the Croce D'Aune Campagnolo needed to remove his rear wheel to change gears. Because the large wingnuts that held his wheel on had frozen, and his hands were too cold to budge them, he was unable to remove his wheel to change gears, and lost his chance at victory that day.



Campy rear derailaur

As he struggled to free his wheel, he muttered five words to himself that changed the history of cycling: 
"Bisogno cambiá qualcossa de drio!"  ("Something must change in the rear!") and that simple event -- a wheel that couldn't be removed -- started Campagnolo thinking. He went back to his workshop, and emerged with the invention of the quick-release lever (in 1930) and, soon after, an early bicycle derailleur (1933).

Passo Croce d'Aune Dolomites

HOW TO GET TO PASSO CROCE D'AUNE IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

The nearest train line is in the town of Feltre then you can find a local bus that goes up to the pass.  If you are bike touring the area you can cycle to the southern side by crossing Monte Grappa, or ride the Valsugana Bike Path to Reach Arse, also riding over Passo Brocon is a nice option is you wish to reach the northern (classic) route.  I do not recommend riding up the valley along SP80 there are too many tunnels and most do not have access roads to the side.

WHERE TO STAY WHEN VISITING PASSO CROCE D'AUNE

If you cycling the area you can reach the pass as part of the Monte Grappa loop from Bassano del Grappa or Asolo
Feltre
Fiera di Priemero
Belluno
If you are hiking there are hotels in the Pass and rifugio's
OUTDOOR RECREATION AND TRAVEL TIPS FOR PASSO CROCE D'AUNE

Bike Tour Passo Croce d'Aune in the Italian Dolomites

Cycle Passo Brocon from Grigno Bike Tour, Trento Province

PASSO BROCON FROM GRIGNO BIKE CLIMB | DOLOMITES

Passo Brocon Bike Tour Dolomites

BiIke Touring Passo Brocon from Grigno is a great ride that allows you to transfer from Val Surgana and over theLagorai Mountain Group to Fiera di Primiero, and  the passes of the Pale di San Martino Mountain Group (Passo Rolle and Passo Cereda). To get to the start of the climb you can either ride up the valley from the town of Bassano del Grappa or down the valley from city of Trento using the Valsugana bike path.  The ride is in the Dolomites of  the Trento Province, in the Trentino Alto Adige Region.

Passo Brocon Dolomites Map

BIKE TOURING ITALY'S CLASSIC CLIMB PASSO BROCON FROM GRIGNO

Passo Brocon Dolomites Climb Profile

 

Passo Brocon Doloimtes Climb Profile

Dolomites of the Friuli Venezia

DOLOMITES OF THE FRIULI VENEZIA REGION

Friuli Venezia Dolomites

The natural Park of the Friuli Dolomites which covers an area of 37,000 hectares incorporates one of the most beautiful areas of the region. It includes the municipalities of Andreis, Cimolais,Claut, Erto, Casso, Frisanco and Tramonti di Sopra which are part of the province of Pordenone; and Forni di Sopra and Forni di Sotto which are both in Udine.

The main area of the Park, which in the past was not easily accessible due to its complex mountain network, has been preserved thanks to limited intrusion by humans. Its habitat and its spectacular landscape offer a high degree of wilderness, which makes this area a paradise for excursions, trekking and mountain climbing.

Many itineraries have been carefully modified and provided with accommodation facilities. They are spread over a territory of great geological interest, probably the most complex territory of the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region. Due to erosions caused by pollution, the rocks of the Dolomites have been re-modelled into different, spectacular shapes whose range of colours modifies according to the different light.

The “bell-tower” of Val Montanaia is the symbol of the Monfalconi area, which is part of a typical dolomite landscape. It is an imposing rocky tower which was climbed for the first time in 1902 by the two Austrian alpinists, Saar and Glanvell.

An easy route made by the Alpine troops at the beginning of the 1900s, leads you up to the Casera Casamento, where dinosaur footprints have been recently discovered embedded in the rocks. This discovery is of great interest.   

The footprints belonged to a two-footed animal with three digits on each foot, which probably lived in the Triassic era 215 million years ago, when the area was covered by vast mud flats.
An easy panoramic route from Costa to Casso, also known as the ancient “coal road” (Trui dalSciarbon), leads you to theZemola Valley, which is important from natural, historical and ethnographical viewpoints. Its pleasant landscape blends with the ancient and severe architecture of Erto and Casso, unfortunately, the images evoked by the tragic dam-burst and flooding of the Vajont valley inevitably dims the charm of this place.

At the end of 1600, the road was used by women who carried heavy panniers of coal on their shoulders. The coal was produced in the coal mines (poiàt) and transported down to Longarone. From there, it was loaded on to rafts which transited along the Piave river to Venice. This exhausting activity took place until the fifties but only in the last years was a cable car used to transport the coal down to the Piave valley.

It is easy to see many wild animals along the route from the Settimana to the Cimoliana valleys leading to the park or while stopping at the many, recently refurbished refuges. The patient and careful watcher is rewarded by the unforgettable sight of bucks, deer, chamois, and, higher up, of rock goats and marmots which often peep out from the vegetation and the rocks of their habitat. More easily discernible is the silent but spectacular flora of the Park. Its important species are surely one of the reasons why this territory has become a protected area. The following endemic species such as the sandwort (Arenaria huteri), the Daphne blagayana, a species of Thymelaeacea, the Froelich gentian (Gentiana froelich), the Primula tyrolensis and the Primula Wulfeniana are but some of the many valuable species of plants growing in the area. We should not forget more common species such as the splendid lady’s slipper (Cypripedium calceolus), a kind of orchid which blossoms profusely at the beginning of summer. Besides the flora and the fauna, the park also offers some fresh springs which turn into streams and small torrents and break into the silent woodland, remodelling its landscape and its rocks.

Some promotional projects for the Natural Park of the Friuli Dolomites have been set up particularly in schools. Over the last years, many students from all over the region and surrounding areas, have learned more about this naturalistic area thanks to the guided tours which take place throughout the year and are available to everyone. This is an interesting way of learning how the environment mutates in the different seasons. To help the visitor appreciate and enjoy the nature reserve, six visitors’ centres have been set up in the territory, some of which are open all year round, others by appointment only and only during high season (summer time). They all give additional information about the protected area.

The visitors’ centre at Cimolais is an important point of reference for tourists who wish to have information about the many excursions around the Park, which are ideal for those visitors venturing into the Natural Park for the first time. In particular, there is an educational tour which offers additional information about the fauna, flora, rock formations and vegetation. A brief interlude to familiarize the visitor with the surrounding, natural environment. The visitors’ centre at Erto is entirely dedicated to the floods which happened after the Vajont dam burst in 1963. The area is divided into two sections, one of which hosts an exhibition of old photographs which take us back over the centuries, to discover the traditions and habits of the Vajont inhabitants prior to the tragic event of 9 October 1963 and then to that fatal night, when a huge rockslide from mount Toc fell into the artificial lake, causing the dam to collapse and the death of 2,000 people. The other section gives a detailed analysis of the whole event, starting from the hydroelectric project of the Vajont right up to the court hearing following the tragedy. The story is narrated on descriptive panels; it is also possible to consult technical charts and examine and compare the plastic models of the area. The multimedia room offers a cd-rom which makes it possible to have a more general view of the catastrophe through the computerized reconstruction of the rockslide and original films dating back to that period.

The area of Andreis hosts a bird-life sanctuary, which was set up by an association for the care of wounded birds in cooperation with the local vet association. The area consists of a research centre, a study area, and a network of aviaries. The most interesting part is surely the aviaries, which can be found to the north of Andreis. They host different species of birds such as hawks, kestrels, buzzards, tawny owls, sparrow hawks, one goshawk and one golden eagle. Some of these birds have been so badly injured that will have to remain in captivity; others are freed once they are fully recovered. During convalescence, they are kept in special cages which are kitted out with rehabilitation equipment. When these birds are set free, the Park organises events, which are attended by adults and students, with a view to making them more environmentally aware. In the upper Tagliamento valley, the visitors’ centre at Forni di Sopra hosts the exhibition “La vegetazione del Parco”. It is about the vegetation of the area and is combined with excursions tailor-made for children, such as the “children’s pathway”. The visitors’ centre at Forni di Sotto has an exhibition on the different species of woodland, which is named “Le tipologie forestali del Parco”. 

It also includes interesting itineraries concerning the archaeology of the woodland, such as that of the “Teleferica della Val Poschiadea” (Cable car of the Poschiadea Valley). An additional visitors’ centre is to open soon at Frisanco and it will host an exhibition about dairy farming. The idea of an educational tour about the ancient dairy techniques was carried out after a former local dairy was refurbished. The tour describes the activities in a shepherd’s hut and the production of typical products.

The nearby “Forra del Cellina” Nature Reserve is adjacent to the parkland which extends over the municipalities of Andreis, Barcis and Montereale Valcellina. This Reserve includes the mountainous area between Barcis and Montereale which has been eroded into a gorge by the Cellina torrent. It carries the sediment into the Pordenone area where it is deposited, forming wide river beds.

This narrow gorge is similar to a canyon and is characterized by fluvial erosions which over the centuries, have created appealing rock sculptures such as the “marmitte dei giganti”. A winding road crosses the left side of the gorge for about ten kilometres up to the green lake of Barcis. Today, this attractive trail is not open, but it is due to be refurbished thanks to European Community funding. The tormented aspect of this valley led the most prominent poet of the Cellina valley, Giuseppe Malattia della Vallata (1875-1948), to believe that Dante may have found inspiration for spirals of his Inferno right here.

Forcella Lavardet in the Italian Dolomites

FORCELLA LAVARDET | DOLOMITES

forcella lavardet

Forcella Lavardet is a mountain pass located on the Dolomites at an elevation of 1.542m above the sea level, in Vigo di Cadore, Belluno Province (Italy).  Forcella (Passo) Lavardet connects the town of Campolongo with Canale di Gorto and is closed to traffic, but is open to bicycles.  The route is not paved in all sections and has some great switchbacks to ride.

Located in the Seppada zone, the road up to Forcella Lavardet is famous for it's 14 steep and spectacular hairpin turns, these switchbacks are located between the town of San Pietro and the peak. The road leading up to the pass can become impassable after heavy rains, and there is a wood bridge over the Frison river, in the winter months the road is normally closed.

Guide to the Vie Ferrate Climbs in Italy

CABLE WALKES | VIE FERRATE IN THE DOLOMITES OF ITALY

vie ferrate dolomites

A Vie Ferrate (in English: " Iron Way"), is a fixed-protection climbing path, mostly found in the Dolomites mountain range in northeastern Italy.·

A via Ferrate is a fixed-protection climbing path. The protection consists mostly of heavy-gauge steel wire, periodically fixed to rock with thick metal bars with eyelets on the end. These bars seem very similar to the 're-bar' steel that is used to reinforce concrete in buildings. These metal bars are drilled and cemented into the rock.

In some cases, other types of aids are present, such as rungs of metal (aka 'stempels'), and ladders and bridges.

Some vie ferrate is easy enough that they may be climbed without any technical gear at all. However, many of the ferrate go through areas with huge amounts of vertical exposure and some are fairly difficult technically. Therefore, depending on the level of exposure and technical difficulty (and your own level of comfort with the unprotected climbing), you will want to be physically attached to the ferrata for safety.

Some vie ferrate is easy enough that they may be climbed without any technical gear at all. However, many of the ferrate go through areas with huge amounts of vertical exposure and some are fairly difficult technically. Therefore, depending on the level of exposure and technical difficulty (and your own level of comfort with an unprotected climb), you will want to be physically attached to the ferrata for safety.

For adequate safety, then, a few bits of basic gear are usually needed when climbing on a via ferrate: a harness, a helmet, gloves, and some sort of dynamic attachment from the harness to the ferrata itself. Typically this is some sort of y-shaped lanyard with a dynamic belay device. A good example is the Petzl Zyper-Y. On the end of each tip of the y-shaped lanyard, an auto-locking carabiner is used.

When climbing on the ferrate, both carabiners are locked onto and slid along the wire rope of the ferrate. As rock-attachment points are reached, the carabiners are individually unclipped and re clipped beyond the attachment point, thereby ensuring that one is clipped into the ferrata at all times. Additionally, In areas where the wire rope runs vertically, it is also important to space yourself out from your fellow climbers such that no one climber is on the same segment of wire between two rock-attachment points.

As long as these few simple safety rules are followed, climbing on a via ferrate is about as simple and secure as protected climbing gets! They are a great way to experience the fantastic scenery of the dolomites from a perspective that few usually see.

Italian Dolomites

ITALIAN DOLOMITES | ITALY

Italian Dolomites of Italy

The Italian Dolomites (Ladin: Dolomites; Italian: Dolomiti; German: Dolomiten) are a mountain range located in north-eastern Italy. It considered to be a part of Southern Limestone Alps and extends from the Adige River in the west to the Piave Valley (Pieve di Cadore) in the east. The area most people hear about and that is presented as the Italian Dolomites are located between; the Puster Valley and the Sugana Valley (Val Sugana). The ItalianDolomites are located in the Belluno Province of the Veneto Region, and the Trentino-Alto Adige Region's, Trento Province (Trentino) and Bolzano Province(Alto Adige or Sud Tyrol).

There are also mountain groups of similar geological structure that sit outside of this area that are considered Part of the Italian Dolomites.  To the east of the Piave River, into the Friuli Venezia Region, are the Friuli Dolomites or Dolomitid'Oltrepiave. On the Western side of the Adige River, still in the Trento Province, is The Brenta Dolomites (Dolomiti di Brenta). Also, there is a smaller group called Piccole Dolomiti(Little Dolomites) located in the Vicenza Province.

The  Italian Dolomites are also called the “Monti Pallidi” in Italian, 'Pale Mountains', as their white rocks glow with golden, pink and purple hues at dawn and dusk. The mountains get their modern name from, Déodat de Dolomieu, a French naturalist who first studied and discovered the particular composition that forms their bedrock (double calcium carbonate), unique in the whole Alpine range.
 

 

 

Mountaineering History of the Dolomites

MOUNTAINEERING HISTORY OF THE DOLOMITE MOUNTAINS

dolomites history

The magic of the Italian Dolomite's originates from the sea: the fossils found here bear testimony to this. The landscape of the Dolomites is varied, with wooded valleys and the lush green meadows, above rise the imposing dolomitic towers and a more hostile area. It is a landscape conducive to fantasizing: the kingdom of elves and pixies, trolls and witches. The alpine folk went into the mountains for various reasons: hunting, wood cutting and farming. However, these activities did not involve the climbing of mountain peaks which were looked upon, as sacred and inaccessible places. The undescribable colours that tinge the mountains in the morning light can only enhance this enchanted world and render it even more fantastic. 

It is in this awesome setting that an English man named John Ball, conquered  the Dolomites with the ascent of the Pelmo in the second half of the 18th century. Interest in mountaineering began long before Ball's climb of Pelmo, in the Western Alps in 1760 Mount Blanc was conquered: this bought event brought mountaineering into a specialized league of its own.  There is no written documentation of the first ascent of the Dolomites but it is accepted knowledge that it was made in the Marmolada Group in 1802 by by a group of local priests. However, mountaineering in the Dolomites became very popular towards the mid 18th century.  

After Ball's ascent Francis Fox Tuckett and Leslie Stephen two other English gentlemen and pioneers in mountaineering, dedicated their time and energy to the exploration of the Trentino Dolomites, including the Brenta Dolomites.   German, Austrian and Italian mountaineers soon followed in the discovery and conquest of the untouched peaks. From then on the Dolomites have been a much sought after terrain for some of the best Italian and European climbers: Messner, Cassin, Detassis, Maestri, Comici, Bonatti, Tito Piaz are just a few and all have left their mark on the Dolomites.    Even nowadays, the “ pale mountains” attract millions of mountaineers from all over the world, some are content to repeat the routes opened by famous climbers of the past, others endeavour to open new ones.  

The Dolomites offer a truly spectacular stage on which to play and the less harsh climate, according to Motti, make them a Paradise for mountaineers:  

When the Dolomite peaks were conquered

  • 1852 PALON DEL LATEMAR (Latemar, 2812 m.) Grabmair.
  • 1864: PUNTA PENIA (Marmolada, 3343 m.) Paul Grohmann with A. Dimai and F. Dimai.
  • 1865: CIMA TOSA (Dolomiti di Brenta, 3173 m.) Giuseppe Loss and companions.
  • 1869: SASSO LUNGO (Sasso Lungo, 3181 m.) Paul Grohmann with P. Salcher and F. Innerkofler .
  • 1870: CIMON DELLA PALA (Pale di San Martino, 3185 m.) E.R. Whitwell with C. Lauener and S. Siorpaes.
  • 1872: CATINACCIO D’ANTERMOIA(Catinaccio, 3002 m.)  C.Comyns Tucker and T.H. Carson with A. Bernard.
  • 1872: CIMA DI VEZZANA (Pale di San Martino, 3192 m.) D. H. Freshfield and C.C. Tucker.
  • 1874: CATINACCIO (Catinaccio, 2981 m.) C.Comyns Tucker and T.H. Carson with F. Devouassoud.
  • 1875: SASS MAOR (Pale di San Martino, 2812 m.) H.A. Beachcroft, C.Comyns Tucker with F. Devouassoud and B. Della Santa.
  • 1882: CIMA BRENTA (Dolomiti di Brenta, 3150 m.) E.T. Compton and A. de Falkner with A. Dallagiacoma and M. Nicolussi.
  • 1884: CROZZON DI BRENTA (Dolomiti di Brenta, 3123 m.) Karl schulz and M. Nicolussi.
  • 1885: CAMPANILE ALTO DI BRENTA (Dolomiti di Brenta, 2938 m.) G. Merzbacher with B. Nicolussi.
  • 1887: TORRE WINKLER (Catinaccio, Torri del Vajlet, 2800 m.) Georg Winkler.
  • 1888: TORRE INNERKOFLER (Sasso Lungo, 3081 m.): L. Darmstadter, H. Stabeler, L. Bernard.
  • 1890: Punta delle Cinque Dita (Sasso Lungo, 2996 m.) J. Santler, R. H. Schmitt.
  • 1895: TORRE DELAGO (Catinaccio, Torri del Vajolet,2790 m.) Hermann Delago.
  • 1899: CAMPANILE BASSO (Dolomiti di Brenta, 2877 m.) Otto Ampferer e K. Berger.

Passo Brocon in the Dolomites of Italy

PASSO BROCON | DOLOMITES

Passo Brocon Dolomites

Passo del Brocon (Passo Brocon) sits at 1616 meters a.s.l., is located in the Trento Province of the Trentino Alto Adige Region, and links the valley of Valsugana with Canal S.Bovo and Fiera di Primero.  The road passes over the eastern portion of the Lagorai Mountain Group.  The Pass is well of the beaten path and normally only visited by locals.  Passo Brocon is a great starting point for relaxing Alpine walks and the roads leading up to the pass offer great cycling challenges.

Passo Brocon once belonged to the Austrian Empire and prior to 1866.  After the conflict in 1866 the local Austrian Government wanted to construct a road to reach the pass from Canal S. Bovo, inorder to maintain control of the pass. The pass was an expensive project for its time and after WW1 the entire area become part of the Italy State. 

The Brocon Pass is well known for its variety of alpine flowers but due to being a bit off the main traffic flows, very few tourist make it to the area.  This is a great ride and interesting hiking area for those wishing to escape to remote Italy. The Passo Brocon now hosts a small ski resort and in the summer hiking trails to view flowers and old Austrian fortifications.

Passo Brocon Dolomites

HOW TO GET TO PASSO BROCON IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

The closest train station is in the Valsugana valley that runs between Bassano and Trento. From Trento you can find buses that will get you to Castel Tresino.  If you are on bicycle you can ride the Valsugana Bike Path and then do the climb from Gringo or Stingo. From the north Passo Brocon can be reached from Canal S. Bovo.

WHERE TO STAY AND EAT WHEN VISITING PASSO BROCON

If you are a hiker there are two good hotels Rifugio in the Pass

If you are bicycle touring the area it this is a great transition ride to get from Valsugana over to Fiera di Primeiro, or over Passo Croce d'Aune from Feltre.

OUTDOOR RECREATION AND TRAVEL TIPS FOR PASSO BROCON

Bike Tour Passo del Brocon in the Italian Dolomites

Bike Touring Passo Brocon from Ponte Serre

Passo Campolongo | Dolomites

PASSO CAMPOLONGO | DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Italy, Passo Campolongo Dolomites

Passo Campolongo sits at 1875 meters a.s.l., and is one of the  4 passes surrounding the Sella Mountain Group in the Italian Dolomites.  Passo Campolongo is crossed each year by, cyclist in the summer and skiers in the winter and is one of the climbs included the Maratona dles Dolomites each year, and the route on every cyclist's bucket list, for riding in the Italian Dolomites.

There are two routes leading up to Passo Campolongo, one from Corvara and the other from Arabba.  There is always a debate on weather the clockwise or counter clockwise route, for the 4 passes, is hardest.  I have enjoyed riding the route both directions and feel the clock wise route is the more exciting and visual route, and the counter clockwise route is a bit harder, and I do not like the traffic you find climbing Passo Gardena from Corvara, or Passo Sella from Selva di Valgardena. 

4 Passes of the Dolomites

Passo Campolongo connects Corvara in Badia, in the Trentino Alto Adige Region, with Arabba in the Veneto Region.  The pass separates the Sella Mountain Group to the west with monte Pralongia to the east.  The area is well known for the grassland that is utilized to graze Cattle. There are excellent hikes starting from the Pass and some great Mountain Bike Trails.

 Passo Campolungo

HOW TO GET TO PASSO CAMPOLONGO IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

There is no train to reach Passo Campolongo, but you can get a Dolomiti Bus from Arabba or Corvara to reach the pass.  If you are bike touring you can reach the pass from Arabba by coming come Alleghe, Passo Fedaia, Passo Giau, Passo Falzarego or Passo Pordoi.  You can reach the pass from Corava by riding from La Ville, Brunico, Passo Gardena, or Passo Valparola.

WHERE TO STAY AND EAT WHEN VISITING PASSO CAMPOLONGO

 

OUTDOOR RECREATION AND TRAVEL TIPS FOR PASSO CAMPOLONGO

Bike Tour Passo Campolongo in the Italian Dolomites

Passo Cereda in the Dolomites of Italy

PASSO CEREDA | DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Italy, Passo Cereda Dolomites

Passo Cereda sits at 1369 meters a.s.l. and forms the boundary between the Trento Province, of the Trentino Alto Adige and Belluno Province, of the Veneto Region.  Located in the southern slopes of the Pale di San Martino Mountian Group, Passo Cereda is one of the lesser known climbs of the Dolomites, but an excellent route to link several valleys and passes of the Italian Dolomites. 

Passo Cereda links Fiera di Primiero with the Agordo valley, and town of Agordo, for a cyclist this is a classic linkup to reach Passo Duran, Passo Rolle, Passo S. Pelligrino, Passo Brocon and others. There are three routes up to Passo Cereda. For me the best ride is from Fiera di Primiero, an 8.4 km climb with an average grade of 9%.  The ride over the pass from Agordo is 3 times as long but an easy ride that makes a loop route over Passo Rolle and Passo Valles back to Agordo an excellent day.

Passo Cereda Dolomites

HOW TO GET TO PASSO CEREDA IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

The closest train station to Passo Cereda is in the towns of Feltre or Belluno.  The Dolomite Bus systems pass through the pass, you can get either to Agordo with a regional bus from Belluno, or you can reach Fiera di Primiero from Feltre. 

If you are cycling I do not recommend riding up the valley from Feltre to Fiera di Primier there are several tunnels.  You should ride over Passo Croce d'Aune the Passo Brocon, or ride from the north from the Fassa Valley and Passo S. Pelligrino, Passo Valles, and Passo Rolle.

WHERE TO STAY AND EAT WHEN VISITING PASSO CEREDA

There are three hotels in Passo Cereda or you can base yourself in:

Fiera di Primiero
Agordo
OUTDOOR RECREATION AND TRAVEL TIPS FOR PASSO CEREDA

Bike Tour Passo Cereda in the Italian Dolomites

Passo Costalunga | Dolomites

PASSO COSTALUNGA | DOLOMITES

Passo Costalunga Dolomites

Passo Costalunga sits at 1745 meters a.s.l. and is located in the Bolzano Province of the Trentino Alto Adige Region.  Passo Costalunga (know as Karerpass in German) separates the Italian Dolomites of the Catinaccio Mountian Group to the north and the Latemar Mountain Group to the south.  The state road was built in the late 1800's, when the area was still controlled by the Austrian Empire, to connect Nova Levante with Vigo di Fassa. Later in the 1930's the road was enlarged by the Italian's into two lanes.

Passo Costalunga is a popular escape for the people living in Bolzano and the surrounding valley.  Therefore, it is busy on the weekends, and because the road is well built it has more local traffic.  The Pass is well known for several lovely mountain walks, in the winter time there is a small ski area.  For a cyclist it is a great route to transfer from the Fassa Valley and the Italian Dolomites over to Bolzano and the Italian Alps.

Passo Costalunga

HOW TO GET TO THE COSTALUNGA PASS IN THE DOLOMITES OF ITALY

By train you need to arrive to Bolzano and then you can get a regional bus that goes to Vigo di Fassa and stops in Passo Costalunga.  If you are cycling the ride from Vigo di Fassa is recommended the other side from Bolzano can be heavy with traffic.  There is a bike path running from Predazzo to Pozzo di Fassa which will keep you away for the heavy traffic down the Fiemme Valley.

Passes that you can ride in the area: Passo Nigra, Passo Lavaze, Passo San Pellegrino, or Passo Fedaia.

WHERE TO STAY WHEN VISITING  PASSO COSTALUNGA ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Bolzano has the best after active events and is an easy ride up to the pass by bus car.  

There are several hotels in the pass of Costalunga

OUTDOOR RECREATION REPORTS AND VACATION TIPS FOR PASSO COSTALUNGA

Passo Croce d'Aune Bike Climb From Ponte d'Oltra

CROCE D'AUNE FROM PONTE D'OLTRA BIKE CLIMB | DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Italy, Passo d'Aune Dolomite's

Croce d'Auneis a small pass just north of Feltre, located in Belluno province of the Veneto.This mountain pass was once the main route of communication between Feltre and the Cismon Valley. Now a tunnel and road has been constructed, resulting in this special spot being forgotten.  There are lots of hiking paths starting from the Croce d'Aune and this happens to be the start point of the Belluno Dolomiti National Park.   

The pass is the site where Tullio Campagnolo (from Vicenza) had the inspiration to develop the skewer (quick release) for the bike wheel. He was racing across the pass in the 1920's and due to bad weather and cold Campagnolo had trouble taking off this back wheel to change a flat. He had the idea to create a quick release system and this item became one of the many patented items he would go on to develop when he opened his factory in 1933.   An exceptionally crafted monument has been placed at the pass to recognize Tullio Campagnolo and his innovations in the bike industry. 

Bike Tour Italy, Passo Croce d'Aune Dolomite Map

I do not recommend riding the main road up the valley toward San Martino and using the tunnel, although it is not very long you can find heavy traffic at times. Just before the tunnel you can take the road around that runs along the river. You can also ride Passo Borcon, the Sugana Valley bike path, Passo Cedere from Agordo and add Passo d'Aune in as part of your ride.

The classic way to ride the pass is from Ponte d'Oltra, the road has less traffic then from Feltre and is a better ascent than descent.

Start Elevation 401 meters
Max Elevation 1,015 meters
Length· 11.3 km
Elevation Gain 992 meters
Average Grade 5.4%
Max Grade 15.5%
Difficulty  

Bike Tour Italy, Passo Croce d'Aune Dolomite's

Turn off for the pass is well marked on both sides.

Bike Tour Italy, Passo Corce d'Aune Dolomite's

Just after the village the hardest part of the climb starts. There is a water fountain at this point.

Bike Tour Italy, Passo Croce d'Aune Dolomite's

This is a great ride and not overwhelming, a good early or late season route to add some elevation to your bike route and to see a part of cycling history.

Biek Tour Italy, Passo Croce d'Aune Dolomite's

Then it is a quick descent back down into the valley

Bike Tour Italy, Passo d'Aune Dolomite's

Passo Duran | Dolomites

PASSO DURAN | Italian DOLOMITES

Passo Duran Dolomites

Passo Duran sits at 2546 meters a.s.l. and separates the Civetta Mountain Group and the Schiara Mountain Group of the Italian Dolomites.  Passo Duran is located in the Belluno Province of the Veneto Region and connects Agordo with the Zoldo Valley. Arriving at the pass from the western side, the town of Agordo, you see one of the classic views of the Bellunese Dolomites. 

Passo Duran is one of the classic bike tours in Italy and should be on your list of places to ride.  The pass is also is a start point or transition point to many of the great hikes in the Dolomites.  Not having bus service means that the pass is quiet and off the beaten path of large groups of tourist.  The Moiazza mountain sits to the north of the pass and there are several great vie Ferrate and Alpine climbs to explore.

 Passo Duran Dolomites

HOW TO GET TO PASSO DURAN, IN THE DOLOMITES OF ITALY

Passo Duran can be reached by car, bike, or foot.  There is no public transportation up to the pass the closest you can get is either by bus to Agordo, or by bus to Forno di Zoldo.  The closest you can reach Passo Duran by train is Belluno or Longarone. 

The best way to ride Passo Duran is to base yourself in Agordo, Arabba, Cortina, or Belluno and make a loop ride.  A great day of riding if you are unsupported is to ride over and back from Agordo.   Typically you want to ride down the valley of Agordo due to traffic and the amount of tunnels, passes nearby that you can ride over are Passo Ceredo, Passo Staulanza and Passo Giau.

PLACES TO STAY when visiting PASSO DURAN

Places to stay if you are bike touring or driving.

Agordo
Alleghe
Capria

Places to stay if you are hiking.

Agordo
Zoldo di Forno
One of the Refuigio's in the pass

OUTDOOR RECREATION ACTIVITES AT PASSO DURAN

Bike Touring Passo Duran in the Italian Dolomites

 

Passo Duran Bike Climb from Agordo | Dolomites

PASSO DURAN FROM AGORDO BIKE CLIMB | BIKE TOURING DOLOMITES

Passo Duran Bike Tour Italian Dolomites

Bike Touring in the Italian Dolomites and riding up Passo Duran from the Agordo side is a great excursion but one not to be taken lightly.  This is the hardest side of the pass to ride with sections over 12% grade. This climb has been a part of one of the better know Granfondo and is considered by locals as one of the more difficult climbs in the Dolomites.  The section of the climb is on a wide road with rideable grades, then for 7 km the road narrows and winds it way through the woods where you will encounter ramps up to 14%.  The last 2 km section is much easier, and you have a wonderful view of the Dolomites to set your sights on.

Passo Duran map

WHERE IS PASSO DURAN

Passo Duran is located a the southern part fo the Civetta Mountain group and separates the Agordo valley from the Zoldo valley.  The closet train station in Belluno or Longarone, both are possible departure points for a one day ride, but you need to be in good shape.  Most people ride the pass as a transition stage during their vacation or out of Alleghe or the town of Agordo you can make a nice loop ride.

PASSO DURAN FROM AGORDO BIKE ROUTE PROFILE

Passo Duran from Agordo Bike Route Profile

REGION Veneto Region
PROVINCE Belluno Province
LOCATION Civetta Mountain Group
START POINT Agordo
ELEVATION AT START 347 meters a.s.l.
MAXIMUM ELEVATION 1,605 meters a.s.l.
LENGTH 12.4 km
ELEVATION GAIN 983 meters
AVERAGE GRADE 7.9%
MAXIMUM GRADE 14%
AVERAGE TIME TO RIDE 1:15 hours

ROUTE NOTES FOR PASSO DURAN FROM AGORDO

 Passo Duran Bike Tour Dolomites

You will make the tour off the main road, prior to the town of Agordo if you coming from the south, and just after Agordo if you are coming from the north.

Passo Duran Bike Tour Dolomites

Your first section is through the a built up area and average grade is 7%.

Passo Duran Bike Tour Dolomites

At about the 2 km mark you have some your first views of the Civetta Mountain Group.

Passo Duran Bike Tour Italy

There is a water fountain just before and later after the curve in La Valle Agordina

Passo Duran Bike Tour Dolomties

Around the 4 km point you wil start to enter the woods where you will start to encounter the harder parts of the climb.  Here average grade is above 9%.

Passo Duran Bike Tour Dolomites

On the middle section and upper section of the climb road narrows and it seems to be warped in some sections.  The road condition is not a problem on the climb but the descent can be tricky.

Passo Duran Bike Tour Dolomities

You find the 15% sign on along the climb but the maximum grade is actually 14%. 

Passo Duran Bike Tour Dolomities

Last two kilometers are much easier, and you have some spectacular views as you start to catch your breath.

Passo Duran Bike Tour Dolomites

As you contour the last section you will finally reach the pass where you have a tremendous view of the Belluno Province of the Veneto, Dolomites.  I hope you are able to be there on a clear day it is one of the top views in the Dolomites.

Passo Duran to Dont Descent, Bike Touring | Belluno Province

PASSO DURAN TO DONT DESCENT | Bike touring DOLOMITES

Passo Duran Dolomites

When you ride the classic route up to Passo Duran from Agordo you are then confronted with one of the hardest descents in the Italian Dolomites.  The ride down from Zoldo Alto to the town of Dont, (where you can turn left and ride Passo Staulanza), is short but very technical. Through out the ride you need to be fully alert, because this is not a descent you can relax and refuel on, the road is uneven, narrows as it passes through a couple of villages, and difficult to read.  Combine all this with the grade of the incline you have to be attentive of your speed and the lines you pick, as you tackle what seems to one giant curve down the Civetta Mountain Group.

Passo Duran Dolomites

PASSO DURAN TO DONT TECHNICAL NOTES

REGION Veneto Region
PROVINCE Belluno Province
MOUNTAIN GROUP Civetta Mountain Group
MOUNTAIN PASS Passo Duran
ARRIVAL POINT Dont
LENGTH 8.4 km
ELEVATION LOST 671 meters
NUMBER OF SWITCHBACKS 6
NUMBER OF CURVES 43
AVERAGE GRADE 8.2%
MAXIMUN GRADE 13 %

ROUTE NOTES

As you leave Passo Duran you will have a few easy curves and quickly pick up speed, after 1 km you will start to find the road uneven and lots of shifting curves. The road is narrow and the shoulders drop off so you want to maintain your line in the middle of your lane.  There are several blind curves so you will want to control your speed.

Passo Duran

You will find the first switchback and the turning radius is good so you can pick a fast line, but traffic can approach quickly so you attentive to your exit.

Passo Duran, Dolomites

After the second switchback you are entering the fastest part of the descent.  The grade is steeper here and the road narrows.  Just before small village you Chiesa is your maximun velocity point, when you see the precentage of grade sign, it is a good note to be extra careful because you are about to pass through a few villages.

Passo Duran Dolomites

After the village of Chiese is the village of Gavaz.  This can be an obsticle course sometimes because of cars parked on the side of the road and on coming traffic will cut the curve. You will want to control your speed and be attentive as you pass through these points.

Passo Duran Dolomites

After Gavaz the road opens back up and you are in the last strecth before reaching Dont.  You can run easy for a few moments but the last few switchbacks are coming up quick. 

Passo Duran, Dolomites

After your last set of switchbacks you will enter into the village of Dont.  Caution! during this part. You are at the end of the descent and from here you can turn right and down to Zoldo or turn left and start the Passo Staulanze climb.

Passo Duran Dolomties

This is one of the more technical descents and one of my favorite. You need to be in control but once you have done the ride a few times you can really appreciate the body and bike control you need.  This is the type of ride that will make you a better cyclist. Always use caution and be safe on the road!!

Passo Falzarego from Pocol Bike Climb

PASSO FALZAREGO FROM POCOL BIKE CLIMB | Bike touring DOLOMITES

Descending from Passo Giau you will arrive to Pocol at 1539 meters a.s.l. and have the option to turn right and desend down into Cortino or turn right and ride up to Passo Falzarego and perhaps also Passo Valparola.  This is a great part of a loop ride from Alleghe or a transition ride over to Arabba to start the Sellarounda (4 passes climb).  This is better side of Passo Falzarego to ride up while the opossing side is one of the best descents in the Dolomites.  The climb is not very difficult and there are only a couple of short sections above 10%.  But on a long day this climb can still be very challenging.  Do not forget to plan time to stop to take the lift up to see the Tofane.

passo falzarego map

Bike Touring in the Italian Dolomites should include a ride up Passo Falzarego.  The ride from the Pocol intersect is a route normally connected with the Passo Giau ride.

Passo FalzArego Bike Tour from Pocol Climb Notes

falzarego valparola from pocol bike tour

  • Length: 10.4 Km
  • Start Elevation: 1540 meters a.s.l.
  • Highest Elevation: 2105 meters a.s.l.
  • Average Grade: 5.5%
  • Max Grade: 12.5%

 

Passo Falzarego in the Dolomites of Italy

PASSO FALZAREGO | DOLOMITES

Passo Falzarego

Passo Falzarego, sits at 2.105 meters a.s.l. in the Belluno Province, of the Veneto Region. Passo Falarego connects Andráz and Cortina d'Ampezzo and the Passo Valparole in the Trentino Alto Adige Region.  Site of WWI battles and flanked by the Tofane Mountain group. The Pass is a classic if you are making the loop ride over Passo Giau from Alleghe or Cortina d'Ampezzo. There are two sides to ride, but I recommend the descent from Passo Falzarego to Capria, this is one of the best downhills rides in the Italian Dolomites.

The name Falza Rego means false king in ladin and refers to a king of the Fanes, who was supposedly turned to stone for betraying his people. In the pass there is a gondola that takes you up to the Lagazuoi Pizo (2752 meters), where heavy combat occurred during World War I. During the War, the Austrians moved the quickest and secured many of the main peaks in the Italian Dolomites leaving the Italians trying to take the peaks from them.cOne of the unique techniques the Italians utilized in the war was to drill tunnels under the Austrian positions and then pack the tunnel with explosives, in an attempt to cave in the summits.  The old tunnel utilized in the Lagazuoi Pizo attack is still open, and you can climb up or down the tunnel (recommend route is down) utilizing the cabled route (vie Ferrate).

 Passo Falzarego

HOW TO GET TO PASSO FALZAREGO IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

The pass can be reached by the Dolomite Bus system from Cortina d'Ampezzo, Arabba and Corvara.  This section of road is part of the Dolomite Highway, and there are times it can be quite busy. 

If you bike touring the Italian Dolomites you can reach to the, starting from Cortina or Pocol if you are riding over Passo Giau. From Cortina the ascent is 16.4 km long and from Pocol it is 10.4 km. The elevation gain on the climb is 913 meters with an average grade of 5.6 %. And starting from Caprile, the Passo Falzarego ascent is 20.46 km long. Over this distance, you climb 1119 meters with an average grade of 5.5 %.


WHERE TO STAY AND EAT WHEN VISITING PASSO FALZAREGO
OUTDOOR RECREATION AND TRAVEL TIPS FOR PASSO FALZAREGO

Passo Fedaia | Dolomites

PASSO FEDAIA | DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Italy, Passo Fedaia

Passo Fedaia sits at 2057 meters a.s.l. and located in the Maromolada Mountain Group.  The Passo Fedaia separates the Veneto Region from the Trentino Alto Adige Region, and connects the town of Canazei with the Agordo Valley.  At the pass you find Lago di Fedaia, this is the site from the movie "The Italian Job", (where the guy double crossed the others). Reflected in the lake is the Marmolada 'Queen of the Dolomites' and the highest peak. 

Passo Fedaia and the Marmolada Mountain Groups was part of the WWI front between Austria and Italy.  On the glacier area several tunnels and galleries were built to protect and house the troops during the winter months, and though not of the ice fortifications remain there are still signs of the war to be seen.  The Passo Fedaia is a great starting point for several great hikes and classic climbs.  There is also skiing on the southern slopes that offers some the best ski runs in the Dolomites.  Cyclist tourist challenges themselves each season on the classic bike climbs of the Passo Fedaia.

Passo Fedaia, Dolomites

HOW TO GET TO PASSO FEDAIA IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Passo Fedaia can be reached from Canazei (Trentino Alto Adige Region) by a regional bus.  If you are arriving from the southern side (Veneto Region) you can find a bus from Agordo that will bring you to Malga Ciapela.  Passo Fedaia is about a 2:45 minutes from Venice. 

By bicycle Passo Fedaia is generally used as a transition ride to move from the Alleghe area over to the Fassa Valley.  The best bike ride is from Caprile to Passo Fedaia, this route is one of the hardest climbs in the Dolomites with some sections being over 15% grade.  It is always better to ride down the Fassa Valley rather than up the valley, and the ride up from Canazei is not a nice since there tends to be more traffic.  Passo Fedaia is great to link Passo Costalungo, Passo San Pellegrino, Passo Pordoi, and Passo Valles.  

WHERE TO STAY WHEN VISITING  PASSO FEDAIA

If you are bike touring your best locations are:

Alleghe
Caprile
Canazei

If you are hiking or climbing there are a few refugio's in the pass.

OUTDOOR RECREATION REPORTS AND TRAVEL TIPS FOR PASSO FEDAIA

Bike Touring Passo Fedaia in the Italian Dolomites

Passo Fedaia Bike Climb From Caprile | Dolomites

PASSO FEDAIA FROM CAPRILE BIKE CLIMB | DOLOMITES

Bike Touring Italy's Passo Fedaia

The Bike Tour up from Caprile is the classic route and one used most by the Giro d'Italia, the road follows ss 641 up the valley for 15.5 km to reach the pass from the southern side.  The route up to Passo Fedaia from Caprile can be deceptive and although not particularly high on the difficulty scale this touring route can be a challenge and is considered by many one of the hardest climbs in the Dolomites. I enjoy climbing up to Passo Fedaia from Caprile much more than the Canazei side because there is less traffic, and the environment is more open. You have a great view of the Marmolade mountain group, and you can see your objective most of the route. 

GETTING TO THE PASSO FEDAIA CLIMB

If you are planning to ride up Passo Fedaia from Caprile you must reach the Agordo Valley. During a Dolomite's Bike Tour most people find it is easiest to base themselves in Alleghe, Arabba, or Canazei, all three give you multi day route options. There are no train lines close enough to allow you to do this route in a day if you are not prepared to ride 80 to 100 miles.

PASSO FEDAIA BIKE CLIMB

Bike Touring Italy's Passo Fedaia from Caprile

REGION Veneto Region
PROVINCE Belluno Province
MOUNTAIN GROUP Marmolada Mountain Group
DEPARTURE POINT Caprile
LENGTH 13.5 kilometers
START ELEVATION 998 meters a.s.l.
MAXIMUM ELEVATION 2236 meters a.s.l.
ELEVATION GAIN 1238 meters
AVERAGE GRADE 7.5%
MAXIMUM GRADE 18%
AVERAGE TIME TO RIDE  1:30
SPECIAL NOTES  
   

ROUTE NOTES

Bike Touring Italy's Passo Fedaia

View of Malga Ciapela in the lower part of the valley.

Section 1

The starting point of the climb is at the village of Caprile, part of the Alleghe community, and is on SS 203, also intersecting this point is SS 641 coming from Selva di Cadore and Passo Giau.  Arrive in Caprile from the south you are taking the left over the bridge and following the signs to Passo Fedaia.  If you are coming down the Valley from Arabba you will take a right once you arrive at the intersection just prior to Caprile.  Your first 1.7 km of the climb is an easy spin averaging around 4.5% then a short ramp of 300 meters at 9%.  After this short section the climb is very ridable, passing through the town of Rocca Pietore, (captial of the Val Pettorina, where the local's have keep alive te traditions of the Ladin people.) There is another short ramp of 8% before reaching Malga Ciapela, and this is where you start the hard part of the climb.

Bike Tour Italy Passo Fedaia

Last section just before the pass.

Section 2

From the seven kilometer point the ride stays steady above 10% grade for the remaining 6 km of the climb. At the eight kilometer mark you will pass Malga Ciapela and the ski lifts, this is a point to get water or take a break. At the 10 kilometer mark you have a 300 m of 18 percent grade which is the steepest part of the climb. From here you have several switchbacks averaging just over 10% grade with a last ramp of 15% just before he turned the corner to see the Passo Fedaia sign and refugio.

Bike Touring Passo Fedaia Dolomite's

The Fedaia Pass.

Passo Gardena from Corvara Bike Climb

PASSO GARDENA FROM COVARA BIKE CLIMB | BIKE TOURING THE DOLOMITES

For me this is one of the best climbs on the Sellaronda (4 Passes) route in the Dolomites.  However, most individuals visiting the region ride the route clockwise and therefore descends this route rather than climbing.  The climb is challenging but it is also an open climb, in the sense that you have great views and vison thoughtout the climb. As a descent the road is technical but very enjoyable but the better ride is from the Covara side.

BIKE TOURING DOLOMITES | PASSO GARDENA ROUTE NOTES

passo gardena covara

REGION Trentino Alto Adige
PROVINCE Bolzano
MOUNTAIN GROUP Sella Group
START POINT Covara in Badia
FINISH POINT Passo Gardena
LENGTH 9.2 km
START ELEVATION 1522 meters a.s.l.
MAX ELEVATION 2121 meters a.s.l.
ELEVATION GAIN 599 meters
AVERAGE GRADE 6.5%
MAX GRADE 10%
TIME TO RIDE 45 minutes

Passo Gardena from Ponte Gardena Bike Climb

PASSO GARDENA FROM PONTE GARDENA BIKE CLMB | BIKE TOURING DOLOMITES

Passo Gardena is one of the 4 Passes of the Sella Group and famous within the biking community.  Not very many people ride the pass from the valley but if you have the chance it is a great bike tour. This is one of the busiest roads in the Dolomites because it gives acess to day visitors coming from Bolzano.  Therefore, I try to avoid riding during the weekend or on hoildays. 

If you are riding to Passo Gardena on the Sellarounda route you will turn to reach the pass at 1862 meters a.s.l. at the Passo Sella Intersection. This will be a sharp left turn over your shoulder. 

BIKE TOURING DOLOMITES | PASSO GARDENA ROUTE NOTES

passo gardena gardena

REGION Trentino Alto Adige
PROVINCE Bolzano
MOUNTAIN GROUP Sella Mountain Group
DEPARTURE POINT Ponte Gardena
ARRIVAL POINT Passo Gardena
LENGTH 31.7 km
DEPARTURE ELEVATION 467 meters a.s.l.
MAX ELEVATION 2121 meters a.s.l.
ELEVATION GAIN 1660 meters
AVERAGE GRADE 5.2%
MAX GRADE 13%
TIME TO RIDE 2 hr 30 minutes

Passo Gardena in the Dolomites of Italy

PASSO GARDENA | DOLOMITES

Passo Gardena Dolomites

Passo Gardena, at an elevation of 2136 meters a.s.l., is a high mountain pass in the Bolzano Province in the Italian Dolomites, of Italy.  The road leading to Passo Gardena was built in the 1960's, prior to that it was a nice quite alpine pass. Passo Gardena connects Sëlva in the Val Gardena and Corvara in the Val Badia.

The road over Passo Gardena is part of the famous Sella Ronda, in which four linked passes (Passo Gardena, Passo Sella, Passo Pordoi and Passo Campolongo) encircle the spectacular Sella Mountain Group.

Passo Gardena is the fourth of seven Dolomites mountain passes riders cross in the annual Maratona dles Dolomites single-day bicycle race

Passo Gardena Dolomites

HOW TO GET TO PASSO GARDENA IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Located in the Bolzano province of the Trentino Alto Adige, Passo Gardena can be reached by the Dolomiti Bus system from the Bolzano and Brunico.

WHERE TO STAY AND EAT WHEN VISITING PASSO GARDENA

 

OUTDOOR RECREATION AND TRAVEL TIPS FOR PASSO GARDENA

Bike Tour Passo Gardena in the Italian Dolomites

Passo Giau | Dolomites

PASSO GIAU | DOLOMITES

Passo Giau Dolomites

Passo Giau (Passo di Giau) sits at 2,236 meters a.s.l. in the Italian Dolomites. The Passo Giau land area is located in the Belluno Province, of Veneto Region and one of the great destinations for cyclist and hikers. Passo Giau separates the peaks of the Nuvolau and Averau, which are part of the Pelmo Mountain Group.  The pass sits above the town of Cortina to the north and the town of Selva di Cadore to the south west.  This is one of the Italian Dolomites most panoramic locations, from the pass you have a wonderful 360 degree view of the: Marmolada Mountain Group, Tofane Mountain Group, Cristallo Mountain Group,Sorapiss Mountain Group, and many others (there is a nice poster board sign in the parking lot that will help you identify the mountains). 

The Pass Giau once marked the boundary between the Republic of Venice and the Austrian Empire, the old border marker is still on at the pass.  On a pop culture note; some the scenes from the movie 'Ladyhawk' were filmed in the pass.

Passo Giau Dolomites

HOW TO GET TO PASSO GIAU IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Provincial Road 638 passes over Passo Giau and is serviced by Bus from Cortina d'Ampezzo and Selva di Cadore. The Alta Vie 1 hiking trail passes through Passo Giau.

WHERE TO STAY TO EXPLORE PASSO GIAU

For Bike Touring Passo Giau I like the town of Alleghe since it gives you more flexibility to do more rides during your stay.  Cortina is a good choice if you plan on riding Tre Cime di Laverado and the classic Passo Giau loop but then you would need to re-ride the same routes to get to other classic climbs.  Alleghe on the other hand is in the perfect position to ride the Passo Giau, Passo Duran, Passo Staulanza, 4 passes or Passo Pordoi, Passo Sella, Passo Gardena, and Passo Campolungo, plus Passo Fedaia, and Passo S. Pellegrino can easily be reached from Alleghe.

For Hiking, Mountain Biking, or Climbing I would suggest staying in the hotel (rifugio) at the pass. 

OUTDOOR RECREATION IN PASSO GIAU

Bike Touring Passo Giau and the Italian Dolomites

Passo Giau Bike Climb from Capria | Dolomites

PASSO GIAU FROM CAPRIA BIKE CLIMB | DOLOMITES

Bike Touring Italy's Dolomite's, Passo Giau from Selva

One of the best rides and a classic bike ride in the Dolomites is the climb up Passo Giau from Selva di Cadore.  The route actually starts in the valley at Capria where you have a short climb up to Selva di Cadore.  From there the route up is 10 km at an average of 9%.

RIDING PASSO GIAU FROM CAPRILE

Bike Tour Italy's Passo Giau

 

REGION Veneto Region
PROVINCE Belluno Province
MOUNTAIN GROUP Civetta Mountain Group
POINT OF DEPARTURE Caprile
LENGTH 15.6 km
START ELEVATION 998 meters a.s.l.
MAXIMUM ELEVATION 2236 meters a.s.l.
ELEVATION GAIN 1238 meters
MAXIMUM GRADE 14%
AVERAGE GRADE 9.5%
TIME TO RIDE  1:35
SPECIAL NOTES  
  • Difficulty Rating: 142.88

ROUTE NOTES:

From Caprile you have a 5 km climb that runs between 6% to 8%, during this section you must not get too excited and set a good pace so as not to burn out your legs.  

Bike Touring Italian Dolomte's, Selva di Cadore

After reaching Selva di Cadore you will find a fountain if you need water.  It is best to ensure you are filled up at because you will not find other water points along the climb.  Right after the left turn you will have short downhills before reaching the state of the real climb.  At the Passo Giau climb you will have the hardest section of with a short section of 14%.  Once you reach the bridge the climb continues at an average of 9-10%.

Bike Touring Italian Dolomite's. Passo-Giau-tunnel

The third tunnel is one that gives you a great view, but the pass you see on the right of the tower is not Passo Giau, your destination you will see to the far right of the longer band of rock.  This is your 2/3 mark, and the difficulty is averages around 9% for the remaining ride.

passo-giau-top

At the top you have one of the best views of the Dolomite's.

Passo Lavasè in the Dolomites of Italy

PASSO LAVASE | DOLOMITES

Passo Lavase Bike Italy

Passo Lavasè, sitting at 1805 meters a.s.l. is located in the Latemar Mountain Group of the Italian Dolomites.  Located in the Trento Province the pass connects Calavese and the Fiemme Valley with Nova Ponente. A great ride that very few individuals actually come over to ride. 

The Passo Lavaze has an excellent cross country ski area and in the summer time there are several mountain biking trails to explore. Sitting below and to the west of the Pampeago ski resort, the main road sp620, that marks the pass sits in a large upper plain.

Passo Lavaze

HOW TO GET TO PASSO LAVAZE IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

The closest train stop is at Ora/Auer and then you can take a bus to Cavalese. If you are bike touring the Italian Dolomites you can ride the pass from Bolzano in the north by riding toward Passo Costalunga turning off at Ponte Novo following the signs to Cavalese.  For the south you can ride down the Fiemme Valley using a bike path to move up and down the valley.  Passes that in the area to ride is Passo Menghen, Passo Rolle, and Passo S. Pellegrino.

WHERE TO STAY AND EAT WHEN VISITING PASSO LAVASE
OUTDOOR RECREATION AND TRAVEL TIPS FOR PASSO LAVAZE

Bike Tour Passo Lavasè in the Italian Dolomites

Passo Manghen | Lagorai Mountain Group | Dolomites

PASSO MANGHEN | DOLOMITES

Passo Manghen Dolomites

Passo Manghen sits at 2047 meters a.s.l., int eh Lagorai Mountain Group of the Italian Dolomites.  Located in the Trentino Alto Adige Region Paso Manghen connects the town of Borgo Valsugana with the town of Molina in the Fiemme Valley. The Manghen Pass is not well known outside of Italy, but it is one of the classic climbs of the Giro d'Italia, and on most local cyclist to do list. 

To reach Passo Manghen by bicycle there are two start points.  The classic and hardest route is from Borgo Valsugana, 23 km in length, and just over 7% average grade. From Molina the bike climb is shorter at just over 16 km, and the average grade is 7.4%, but there are no extreme grades of 15% like on the southern side.  This is a great early season ride but since the road is not open to commercial traffic it is not always cleared of snow. During the summer months this is a popular motorcycle route so riding on a Sunday can be busy.

Passo Manghen Dolomites

GETTING TO PASSO MANGHEN

Located in the Trento Province you can get a train from the city of Trento to Borgo Valsugana or a Train from Bassano del Grappa in the Veneto Region.  The closest train station Molina, on the northern side is Ora/Auer, you can get a bus from here to Molina. 

If you are arriving by bicycle you can ride the Valsugana bike path from Bassano del Grappa or Trento.  I would not ride the State Road from Ora/Auer since there is heavy traffic, but you can ride the Provincial road 632 from Trento.  If you are arriving from the central Italian Dolomites you can your the Fiemme Valley bike path from Predazzo, the passes of: Passo Lavase, Passo Rolle, Passo S. Pellegrino, Passo Brocon, and Passo Costalunga all can be connected to Passo Manghen.

OUTDOOR RECREATION IN PASSO MANGHEN

Bike Tour Passo Manghen Riding the Climb from Borgo Valsugana

Passo Manghen Bike Climb from Borgo Valsugana

PASSO MANGHEN FROM BORGO VALSUGANA BIKE CLIMB | DOLOMITES

Passo Mengen Dolomites

Passo Manghen is one of the many classic bike routes you should ride if you are visiting Italy. Passo Manghen is located in the Lagorai Group of the Dolomite Mountain, in the Trento-Alto Adige region. The pass connects the valley of Valsugana with the Fiemme valley, and links the two towns of Castelnuovo and Molina. Sitting at 2047 meters (6,716 ft.) it is amongst the highest roads in Italy and the climb itself is rated in the top 20. (for Italy).

 Passo Menghen Dolomites Bike Climb

The pass of Manghen has been part of the Campagnolo granfondo for several years and in 2008 the Giro d'Italia passed over on it's way to finishing in San Martino di C. This year the 2012 Giro d'Italia will be passing over Passo Manghen once again.  This is a great ride and much more challenging then it looks on paper.

PLANNING

Maps: This climb is on both the Touring Club Italian Trentino-Alto Adige Region map and Veneto Region  Map.

The best time to ride this route is between June and October.  The pass could be open in other months depending on snow conditions.

TRAVEL GUIDE PASSO MENGHEN, ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Passo Menghen Bike Profile

REGION Trentino-Alto Adige Region
PROVINCE Trento Province
MOUNTAIN GROUP Lagorai Mountain Group
NEAREST TOWN Borga Valsugana
START ELEVATION 381 meters
MAXIMUN ELEVATION
2042·meters
ELEVATION GAIN
1661·meters
LENGTH 23.4·meters
AVERAGE GRADE
7 %
MAXIMUN GRADE
15%
AVERAGE TIME 2 hours

GETTING TO THE RIDE

Passo Manghen can be reached by riding the Valsugana bike path from Trento south or north from Bassano del Grappa.  If you wanted to ride just the climb you can take the train that runs between Trento and Bassano del Grappa, getting off in Borga Valsugana

The Ride from Castelnuovo to Passo Manghen

The Passo Manghen bike climb is a great bicycle tour to do while you are Italy. This is a very isolated climb so you should consider doing the ride supported or as part of a group.  If you are planning on doing just the ascent and descent from Castelnuovo or Borgo Valsugana you should have no problems.  

The Valsugana Bike Path that runs from Lago Caldonezzo to Bassano del Grappa. If you are arriving by bicycle riding from Bassano you can start the climb from Castelnuovo or Borgo Valsugana.  Riding from Trento you should just start the climb at Borgo Valsugana.  There is also a small train that runs between Trento and Bassano del Grappa that offers bici-train service. You will need to get off at the Borgo Valsugana stop. If you are driving I would park in Castelnuova, there is a free parking area (except Saturday morning) where as Borgo Valsugana most of the parking is pay.  For more options on organizing the ride or questions contact me via email.

Starting from Castelnuovo just need to follow the signs for Passo Manghen. The first 2·km is up to a rotary that links you  with the road from Borgo Valsugana and you are always following the signs toward Passo Manghen. My computer was reading 6% for most of the way up this section. After the rotary you have a section averaging 4.9% until you reach Telva, you do not actually go into the town, the main road contours around and at the 4.4 km point you will turn right following the signs toward Passo Manghen. Up to this point this is the most scenic part of the ride with some great views of the Valsugana in the direction of Bassano del Grappa and the Asiago Plateau.

After Telva and turning right you start riding though the val Calamento forest for a little more than 4 km. This section averages 6.7% and has sections up to 11%. On my computer it showed 12 and 13% several times. Around the 8 km mark there is a small bar on the right if you need supplies or restroom this is generally you last open establishment on most days.

At about the 9.2 km mark the climb will lessen to about 4.8% average until you get to the 12.5 km point. This is the best place to refuel and drink, try to resist driving hard during this section or you will pay later. There are a couple of fountains along this section be sure to fill up because after val Calamento village there is only a couple of mountain streams if you run out of water.

From the 12.5 km point you are nearing the village of val Calamento. ·From here you are riding 9.4% average with most of the next 2 km be greater than 10% with a short section reading 12-13%.  After the village the road narrows and you will have a length of road that will average 5.7% up until the 17.4 km mark.  This is also the first time you will get to see the pass in the distance.

From the 17.4 km mark you will now face the hardest part of the climb. The average grade up to from this point is 9.9%, and you will have just over 7 km remaining. There are several points of 12 and 13% as the road crawls up the bowl leading to the pass. 

passo-menghen-bike-italy-2

At the pass there is the sign post and a cross. If you continue over the pass and about 100 meters down on the Molina side is a Refugio that is generally open. But plan on being alone and self sufficient.

passo-menghen-bike-italy-5

During the descent back down the valley there were two to three sign posts for 15%. Also, my computer read about 2 % harder in many of the listing on salita.ch's and city bikes profiles. The profile I posted is from the 2008 official Giro altimeter and even it has a few different reading then my computers. 

There is little during traffic during the week days, but this pass is on the motorcycle touring list so on Saturday and Sunday there can be several motorcycles on the road, I would try to schedule my ride on a different day.

Passo Pordoi | Dolomites

PASSO PORDOI | DOLOMITES

Passo Pordoi Dolomites of Italy

Passo Pordoi sits at 2,239 meters a.s.l., and the road crossing the pass connects Arabba (Livinallongo del Col di Lana) with Canazei (Val di Fassa).  Pordoi sits between Sass Pordoi (Sella Mountain Group) and the northern peaks of the Marmolada Mountain Group, and marks the border between the Trento Province (Trentino Alto Adige Region) and Belluno Province (Veneto Region). Passo Pordoi is the highest paved road traversing a pass in the Italian Dolomites.


Riding from Canazei the pass is 12 km away, and features 28 hairpin turns as you work your way to the summit. Passo Pordoi is one of the 4 passes of the Dolomites Road, built in the early 1900's to link the town of Bolzano with Cortina d'Ampezzo, and encourage the development of tourism in the Ladin valleys. 

Passo Pordoi has played a role in Italian history, battles of the First World War were fought in the pass. Tourism was developed on the pass thanks to Maria Piaz, sister of the famous alpinist Tita Piaz.

Passo Pordoi Dolomites

HOW TO GET TO PASSO PORDOI IN THE DOLOMITES OF ITALY

There are no trains that reach Passo Pordoi, the closest stations are Ora or Bolzano in the Trentino Alto Adige Region and Belluno in the Veneto Region.  From these towns you can get a Dolomite Bus, from the western side Canazei is the closest town and from the southeastern Arabba is the closest.

WHERE TO STAY WHEN VISITING PASSO PORDOI

For cyclist the best areas to stay would be

Alleghe
Arabba
Canazei
Corvara

For Hikers and Climbers I recommend one of the Refugio in the Pass.

OUTDOOR RECREATION REPORTS AND TRAVEL TIPS FOR PASSO PORDOI

Bike Touring Passo Pordoi in the Italian Dolomites

Passo Pordoi Bike Climb from Arabba | Bike Touring Dolomites

PASSO PORDOI FROM ARABBA BIKE CLIMB | DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Passo Padoi

One of the best bike tours in Italy is the Passo Pordoi climb, in the Italian Dolomites.  The Passo Pordoi bike ride from Arabba is a unique ride and has great open views throughout the climb.  This makes the route a favorite passage for many types of visitors, so on some days it can be very busy, but the road is wide and well maintained.  On a windy day or poor weather this route can be very difficult since you are very exposed throughout the ride.

passo pordoi from arraba

GETTING TO PASSO PORDIO CLIMB IN THE DOLOMITES

To get to Arabba most people either come from the Agordo valley (perhaps staying over night in Alleghe) Or descend from Passo Campolongo or Passo Falzarego.  Passo Pordio is one of the 4 passes on the famous Sellarounda ride (4 passes of the Dolomites).

PASSO PORDIO FROM AGORDO BIKE CLIMB PROFILE

Bike Tour Passo Padoi Profile

REGION Veneto Region
PROVINCE Belluno Province
MOUNTAIN GROUP Sella Mountain Group
START POINT Arabba
LENGTH 9 KM
START ELEVATION 1602 meters a.s.l.
MAXIMUM ELEVATION 2239 meters a.s.l.
ELEVATION GAIN 637 meters
AVERAGE GRADE 7%
MAXIMUM GRADE 10%

PASSO PORDOI ROUTE NOTES

There is a water fountain in front of the church as you exit Arabba.  The first 3 km are perhaps the hardest of the climb averaging just over 7.5% with a short ramp of 10%.

Passo Padoi Bike Tour

After the 4 km point you move over to the opposite side of the ridgeline and start a steady climb that is very exposed. It is this exposure that can make the climb hard when there is wind and rain.  The average grade from this point forward is just under 7% with a few short ramps over 9%.

Passo Padoi Bike touring Italy

In the last 2 kms the switchbacks start to tighten and you have some wonderful views as you grab a bit ofrest work through the turns.  The last grade stays steady all the way to the high point of the pass.  A great climb that requires a steady pace and it is important not to overwork if you are planning to work through the rest of the 4 Passes ofPasso Sella, Passo Gardena, and Passo Camplongo.

Passo San Pellegrino from Cencenighe Bike Tour, Belluno Province

PASSO SAN PELLEGRINO FROM CENCENIGHE BIKE CLIMB | DOLOMITES

Bike Tour Italy, Passo San Pellegrino

Bike Touring ItalysDolomites should include a ride up to Passo San Pellegrino from Cencenighe.  This is the hardest climb of the two sides with sections over 15% and used regularly in the Giro d-Italia. The start point for this climb is in the Belluno Province of the Veneto Region by riding south from through Alleghe or riding north from Agordo. 

Bike Tour Italy, San Pellegrino

ROUTE PROFILE AND CLIMB DETAILS

Bike Toru Italy Passo San Pellegrino

REGION Veneto Region
PROVINCE Belluno Province`
MOUNTAIN GROUP
START POINT Cencenighe Agordino
ELEVATION AT START 771 meters a.s.l.
MAXIMUM ELEVATION 1918 meters a.s.l.
LENGTH 18.4 km
ELEVATION GAIN 1047 meters
AVERAGE GRADE 7.9%
MAXIMUM GRADE 18 %
AVERAGE TIME TO RIDE 1:45 hours

Passo Staulanza | Dolomites

PASSO STAULANZA | DOLOMITES

Passo Staulanza, Dolomites

Passo Staulanza, sits at an elevation of 1773m. above the sea level, it is a high mountain pass located in the Italian Dolomites.  Passo Staulanza (or Forcella Staulanza) is part of the Belluno Province in the Veneto Region in northeast Italy. The Passo Staulanza connects the southern valley of Zoldo with the Cadore valley in the north, as well the pass separates  Mount Coldai (2.395m) of the Civetta Mountain Group with Monte Pelmo (3.168m), ofPelmo Mountain Group.  There are good facilities in the villages leading up to the Pass but at the summit of the pass there is only one Rifugio.

Passo Staulanza is part of the classic bike tour routes of the Dolomites.  The Giro d'Italia has crossed over the pass several times as a transition to other classic climbs. 

Passo Staulanza also sits on the Alto Vie 1 trail, an upper mountain multi-day trail in the Italian Dolomites.  Both the Civetta Mountain Group to the west and the Pelmo Mountain Group to the east offer great hikes and several classic Alpine climbs.

Passo Staulanza Dolomites

GETTING TO PASSO STAULANZA, ITALIAN DOLOMITES -Passo Staulanze is located along state road 251, which runs from the town of Longarone (just north of Belluno and along the train line), to Selva di Cadore.  The road is surprising large and well maintained, and since it an upper mountain road there are no large trucks and traffic is mild on most days. 

You can reach the Passo Staulanza using the local bus service. 

If you are bike touring the area you can either start you day off by utilizing the train to reach Longarone and then riding northwest toward Done and then up to Passo Staulanza.  After Passo Staulanza descend down to Selva di Cadore where you can either continue to descend to Alleghe or climb Passo Giau and descend down to Cortina d'Ampezzo. 

If you riding from Alleghe you can ride south to Agordo then climb Passo Duran over to the town of Dont and then climb the Passo Staulanza.  The best ride is from Dont up to Passo Staulanza.

Passo Staulanza from Dont Bike Climb | Dolomites

PASSO STAULANZA FROM DONT BIKE CLIMB | BIKE TOURING DOLOMITES

Passo Staulanza, Italian Dolomites

Bike Touring Forcello Staulanza or Passo Staulanzafrom Dont or Forno di Zolo is one the classic bike climbs in the Italian Dolomites.  The climb has been part of the Giro d'Italia multiple times and is used mainly as a transition climb to get to alternate valleys and climbs.  This is a great climb to warm up your legs before tackling  Passo Giau or Passo Fedaia, or a secondary climb after you have finished Passo Duran.  

WHAT TO EXPECT ON THE CLIMB

Cycling from Dont to Passo Staulanza is not a difficult climb but the ever changing percent of grade makes it difficult to get a good rhythm going during your ride.

If you are only riding Passo Staulanza you can get by with a compac and rear cog up to 25.  If you are riding a 53/39 you should have at least a 26 or 27, since there is an 11% max grade. 

PASSO STAULANZA FROM DONT BIKE TOUR ROUTE NOTES

Passo Staulanza, Bike Tour

REGION Veneto Region
PROVINCE Belluno Province
MOUNTAIN GROUP
START POINT Dont
ELEVATION AT START 926 meters a.s.l.
MAXIMUM ELEVATION 1775 meters a.s.l.
LENGTH 12.4 km
ELEVATION GAIN 849 meters
AVERAGE GRADE 7.9%
MAXIMUM GRADE 10.2%
AVERAGE TIME TO RIDE 1:00 hours

THE PASSO STAULANZA CYCLE ROUTE

Passo Staulanza, Italian Dolomites

At the final section of the Passo Duran descend you will intersect with State Road 251, turning right following the sign toward Passo Staulanza.  This first section is actually the hardest part of the 15 km climb. 

Passo Staulanza

The road up to Passo Staulanza is nice and wide, there is traffic so be careful and maintain your line during the ride.

Passo Stualanza

At the 3 km mark you will pass through the town of Fusine and Zoldo Alto. You will have a great view of the Civetta Mountaina Group and the Cordo di Lago Mountains on your left. During this part you will never exceed 8% grade but the elevation keeps changing, as mentioned before it is hard to find a rhythm but you will want to stay relaxed and not burn out your legs. 

Passo Staulanza

During the ride you will have two sections that flatten out a moment, one after Pecolo and then the other after Palavavere, these are great places to make up some time.  You will also get your first glace at the Monte Pelmo Mountain Group, that sits on the eastern side of the Pass.

Passo Staulanza

After Palavavere you will have a few gradual switchbacks to climb, giving you an insight to the great engineered roads throughout the Italian Dolomites.  From here you are only a short distance from the actual Pass.

Passo Staulanza

After the switchbacks you will have a nice gradual section where you can make up some time you have a face descend after the pass.  If you are just starting your day I would descend down to Selva di Cadore where there is a fountain in front of the church, to refill water bottles, or a couple of bars to make a bathroom or cafe stop, before continuing on to Passo Duran, Alleghe, Arabba, or Passo Fedaia.  If you have already completed Passo Duran this is not a bad place to stop for a bit to eat.  The rifugio Staulanza has good quality food. 

Passo Tre Croci

PASSO TRE CROCI | DOLOMITES

passo tre croci

Passo Tre Croci (1,805 m; Són Zuógo in Ladin) sits between the Cristallo Group to the north and the Sorapiss Group (3,205 m) to the south. This relatively low pass connects the Boite valley and Cortina d'Ampezzo with Misurina, Auronzo di Cadore and the val d'Ansiei, in the Belluno Province. At Passo Tre Croci there are some military structures (bunkers) from WW1, that were part of the ‘Sbarramento Passo Tre Croci’ of the ‘Vallo Alpino’; a defensive line that ran all through the eastern Alps, close to what was then the frontier with Austria. From the pass two paths depart to Rifugio Vandelli, in the Sorapiss group.

The Pass was actually renamed after 1789 to Passo Tre Croci or Pass of the Three Crosses after a monther and her two sons died there.  The family was trying to make thier way from Auronzo di Cadore to Cortina but were caught in a storm and died of cold and exposure.

Passo Valparola | Dolomites

PASSO VALPAROLA | DOLOMITES

Passo Valparole, Dolomites

Passo Valparola sits at 2192 meters a.s.l., in the Belluno Province.  The Pass is just before the border between the Veneto Region and Trentino Alto Adige Region, and during the First War World part of the Italian and Austrian Battle Front.  Passo Valparola separates the Tofane Mountian Group and the Pralonga Peak (2138 meters) it is just 2 km west of Passo Falzarego and has been a traditional route between Alta Badia and Cortina d'Ampezzo.

Up until the end of the First World War Passo Valparola was part of Austria's Tyrol area, while the Italian border was at Passo Falzarego.  The Austrians built the Fort Tra i Sassi (Among the rocks) which was mostly destroyed by Italian artillery.  Several small battles occurred along this front, and after the War the area become part of Italy.  There are varied explanations on how the Pass received its name, but is considered to be named after the Iron Works that were in the area in the 1600's. 

Today the pass is not nearly as popular as Passo Falzarego, but it is worth a visit to see the old forts, and the is the small Lago di Valparola that makes a great photo.  The pass has a great views and open year round.

Passo Valparole, Dolomites

HOW TO GET TO PASSO VALPAROLA IN THE DOLOMITES OF ITALY

You can get a regional bus from Cortina d'Ampezzo or Corvara to reach the pass. If you are biking the area, Passo Valparola is just up the road from Passo Falzarego, which can be reached from Cortina d'Amezzo, Passo Giau, or riding up from Capria or Arabba.  Riding over Passo Valparola will take you down in to Alta Badia but even if you are planning on riding else where it is worth the 2 km climb up from Passo Falzarego to see the pass.

WHERE TO STAY WHEN VISITING PASSO di VALPAROLA

If you cycling the area you can reach the pass from:

Cortina d'Ampezzo - via Passo Falzarego
Corvara
Arabba
Alleghe
 
If you are hiking or climbing it is best to stay at the refugio in Passo Valparola or Passo Falzarego
OUTDOOR REPORTS AND TRAVEL TIPS FOR PASSO VALPAROLA

Primary Mountain Peaks in the Italian Dolomites

MAJOR MOUNTAIN PEAKS IN THE ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Punta Penia Dolomites 
Planning a hiking trip in the Dolomites and want to bag some peaks during your walks?  Listed on this page are the principle peaks of each mountain group in the Dolomite's.  Individual information will be updated as I have time to re-walk or climb the peaks.  Enjoy your time in the mountains and always be safe.

PRIMARY PEAKS OF EACH MOUNTAIN GROUP OF THE DOLOMITES

Marmolada Mountain Group:

  • Punta Penia (3343 m)
  • Punta Rocca (3309 m)
  • Cima Ombretta (3011 m)
  • Gran Vernel (3210 m)
  • Pizzo Serauta (3035 m)
  • Sasso di Valfredda (3009 m)

Latemar Mountain Group:

  • Torri di Latemar (2814 m)
  • Paion (2800 m)
  • Cornon (2781 m)
  • Cima di Valsorda (2762 m)
  • Corno Val D'Ega (2713 m)

Catinaccio Mountain Group:

  • Catinaccio d'Antermoia (3004 m)
  • Cima Catinaccio (2981 m)
  • Cima Scalieret (2887 m)
  • Cima di Lausa (2876 m)
  • Torri del Vajolet (2813 m)
  • Croda di Re Laurino (2813 m)
  • Cima Sforcella (2810 m)
  • Roda di Vael (2806 m)
  • Cogolo di Larsec (2679 m)
  • Cima di Terrarossa (2653 m)

Sella Mountain Group:

  • Piz Boè (3151 m)
  • Le Mesules (3000 m)
  • Cima Pisciadù (2986 m)
  • Piz Gralba (2972 m)
  • Sass Pordoi (2950 m)
  • Piz da Lech (2911 m)

Sassolungo Mountain Group:

  • Sassolungo (3184 m)
  • Punta Grohmann (3126 m)
  • Punta delle Cinque Dita (2996 m)
  • Sassopiatto (2964 m)

Pale di San Martino Mountain Group:

  • Cima Vezzana (3192 m)
  • Cimon della Pala (3184 m)
  • Cima dei Bureloni (3130 m)
  • Cima di Focobon (3054 m)
  • Cima di Campido (3001 m)
  • Pala di San Martino (2982 m)
  • Cima Fradusta (2939 m)
  • Mulaz (2906 m)
  • Monte Agnèr (2872 m)
  • Croda Granda (2849 m)
  • Sass Maor (2812 m)
  • Cima Madonna (2752 m)
  • Cima di Rosetta (2742 m)

Odle-Puez Mountain Group:

  • Furchetta (3025 m)
  • Sass Rigais (3025 m)
  • Piz de Puez (2913 m)
  • Sass de Putia (2875 m)
  • Sassongher (2665 m)
  • Gran Cir (2592 m)

Sciliar Mountain Group:

  • Monte Petz (2662 m)
  • Monte Santner (2413 m)
  • Monte Euringer (2394 m)
  • Dolomiti di Fanes-Braies:
  • Cima Conturines (3064 m)
  • La Varella (3055 m)
  • Cima Dieci (3026 m)
  • Cima Nove (2967 m)
  • Picco di Vallandro (2839 m)
  • Sasso di Santa Croce (2837 m)
  • Croda del Becco (2810 m)
  • Col Bechei (2794 m)
  • Monte Serla (2378 m)

Dolomiti di Sesto Mountain Group:

  • Punta dei Tre Scarperi (3145 m)
  • Croda dei Toni o Cima Dodici (3094 m)
  • Cima Undici (3092 m)
  • Monte Popera (3045 m)
  • Tre Cime di Lavaredo (2998 m)
  • Rocca dei Baranci (2966 m)
  • Croda Rossa di Sesto o Cima Dieci (2965 m)
  • Croda dei Baranci (2922m)
  • Cima d'Auronzo (2914 m)
  • Croda dei Rondoi (2873 m)

Cristallo Mountain Group:

  • Monte Cristallo (3221 m)
  • Piz Pòpena (3152 m)
  • Cima di Mezzo (3145 m)
  • Cristallino D'Ampezzo (3008 m)

Cadini di Misurina Mountain Group:

  • Cadino di Nord-Est (2788 m)
  • Forcella del Nevaio (2624 m)
  • Torre Siorpaes (2553 m)
  • Forcella Verzi (2550 m)

Tofane Mountain Group:

  • Tofana di Mezzo (3244 m)
  • Tofana di Dentro (3238 m)
  • Tofana di Rozes (3225 m)
  • Sella delle Tofane (3068 m)
  • Cima Fanis di Mezzo (2989 m)

Marmarole Mountain Group:

  • Cimon del Froppa (2932 m)
  • Cima Bastioni (2926 m)
  • Pala di Meduce (2864 m)
  • Croda Alta (2645 m)
  • Monte Castellin (2601 m)

Col di Lana Mountain Group:

  • Sett Sass (2571 m)
  • Sass de Stria (2477 m)
  • Col di Lana (2452 m)

Sorapiss Mountain Group:

  • Sorapiss (3205 m)
  • Fopa di Mattia (3155 m)
  • Croda Marcora (3145 m)
  • Ponta Negra (2874 m)
  • La Cesta (2797 m)
  • Cima Bel Pra (2914 m)

Antelao Mountain Group:

  • Antelao (3264 m)
  • Punta Menini (3177 m)
  • Chiggiato (3163 m)
  • Fanton (3142 m)

Croda da Lago Mountain Group:

  • Cima Ambrizzola (2715 m)
  • Croda da Lago (2701 m)
  • Monte Cernera (2657 m)
  • Becco di Mezzodì (2603 m)

Nuvolau Mountain Group

  • Monte Averau (2647 m)
  • Nuvolau (2564 m)
  • Gusella (2595 m)
  • Sass de Stria (2477 m)

Civetta Mountain Group:

  • Monte Civetta (3220 m)
  • Piccola Civetta (3207 m)
  • Cima di Tomè (3004 m)
  • Punta Tissi (2992 m)
  • Moiazza Sud (2878 m)
  • Moiazza Nord (2865 m)

Pelmo Mountain Group:

  • Pelmo (3168 m)
  • Pelmetto (2990 m)

Bosconero Mountain Group:

  • Sasso di Bosconero (2468 m)
  • Sassolungo di Cibiana (2413 m)
  • Monte Sfornioi (2409 m)

Vette Feltrine - Cimonega Mountain Group:

  • Sass de Mura (2550 m)
  • Piz Sagron (2485 m)
  • Monte Pavione (2334 m)
  • Col di Luna (2295 m)
  • Monte Ramezza (2250 m)
  • Monte Scarnia (2226 m)
  • Gruppo dello Schiara:
  • Monte Schiara (2563 m)
  • Monte Tamer (2547 m)
  • Monte Talvena (2542 m)
  • Pelf (2502 m)
  • Castello di Moschesin (2499 m)

Dolomiti di Lienz Mountain Group:

  • Gran Sand Spitze (2772 m)
  • Spitzkofel (2718 m)
  • Kreuzkofel (2695 m)
  • Hochstadel (2680 m)
  • Boses Weibele (2599 m)
  • Eggenkofel (2590 m)
  • Reibenkofel (2383 m)

Dolomiti Friulane Mountain Group:

  • Cima dei Preti (2703 m)
  • Monte Durano (2652 m)
  • Monte Cridola (2580 m)
  • Cima Laste (2555 m)
  • Cima Monfalcon (2548 m)
  • Monte Pramaggiore (2479 m)

Dolomiti di Comelico - Dolomiti Carniche Mountain Group:

  • Monte Cavallino (2689 m)
  • Monte Peralba (2670 m)
  • Cima Palombo (2600 m)
  • Monte Vancomune (2581 m)
  • Crode di Longero (2569 m)

Dolomiti di Brenta Mountain Group:

  • Cima Tosa (3178 m)
  • Cima Brenta (3150 m)

Rifugio Panarotta from Assizzi Bike Climb

RIFUGIO PANAROTTA FROM ASSIZZI BIKE CLIMB | DOLOMITES

The bike climb up to Rifugio Panarotta is in found in the Val Sugana, Trento Province.  The climb is not very well known but it is surprising that it is very similar to Alpe d'Huez in length, grade, and difficulty, the only major difference is the number of switchbacks.

BIKE TOURING DOLOMITES ROUTE NOTES

rifugio panarotta

REGION Trentino Alto Adige
PROVINCE Trento
MOUNTAIN GROUP Lagorai Mountain Group
DEPARTURE POINT Levico Terme
ARRIVAL POINT Rifugio Panarotta
LENGTH 15.2 km
ELEVATION DEPARTURE 538 meters a.s.l.
MAX ELEVATION 1780 meters a.s.l.
ELEVATION GAIN 1242 meters
AVERAGE GRADE 8.2%
MAX GRADE 13%
TIME TO RIDE 1 hr 30 minutes

Travel Guide to Passo San Pelligrino in the Dolomites of Italy

PASSO SAN PELLEGRINO | DOLOMITES

Passo S. Pellegrino Bike

Passo S. Pellegrino sits at 1918 meters a.s.l., and connects Falcade in the Veneto Region with Moena in the Trentino Alto Adige Region.  Located on the southern slopes of the Marmolada Mountain Group, Passo S. Pellegrino popular ski resort and departure point for hikes in the Italian Dolomites.  State road 346 leads you over Passo S. Pellegrino and at times it can be busy, but it is the best route to reach the heart of the Italian Dolomites.

In the middle ages the Passo S. Pellegrino was known as Monte Alloch and part of the summer migration trail from the Brenner Pass. In the 1300's the Monks from the order of Saint Pellegrino built a hospice to care for those injured or ill from making the passage and today the pass gets it name from this order of Monks.  Many of the a joining roads were built during the First World War, Passo Valles is a great example.  There are several great mountain bike trails leading through and from the pass that lets you explore some to the old battle positions of the war.

Passo San Pellegrino, Italian Dolomites

GETTING TO PASSO S. PELLIGRINO

State road 346 gives you two primary routes from Moena and Falcade and both great rides up to the Passo Pellegrino. Coming from Falcade is the more challenging ride with ramps up to 15% and there is a tunnel you should ride around, using a service road. The route coming up from Moena is not as stiff of a ride but there tends to be traffic on the weekends. You can also reach the pass by riding up to Passo Rolle and over Passo Valles.  Passo S. Pelligrino can be reached by bus from Agrodo and Moena.

OUTDOOR RECREATION AT PASSO S. PELLIGRINO

Bike Tour Passo S. Pellegrino in the Italian Dolomites

Travel Guide to Passo Staulanza, Italian Dolomites

PASSO STAULANZA | ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Passo Staulanza, Dolomites

Passo Staulanza, sits at an elevation of 1773m. above the sea level, it is a high mountain pass located in the Italian Dolomites.  Passo Staulanza (or Forcella Staulanza) is part of the Belluno Province in the Veneto Region in northeast Italy. The Passo Staulanza connects the southern valley of Zoldo with the Cadore valley in the north, as well the pass separates  Mount Coldai (2.395m) of the Civetta Mountain Group with Monte Pelmo (3.168m), of Pelmo Mountain Group.  There are good facilities in the villages leading up to the Pass but at the summit of the pass there is only one rifugio.

Passo Staulanza is part of the classic bike tour routes of the Dolomites.  The Giro d'Italia has crossed over the pass several times as a transition to other classic climbs.  A classic loop route is our of Cortina d'Ampezzo or Alleghe. 

Passo Staulanza also sits on the Alto Vie 1 trail, an upper mountain multi day trail in the Italian Dolomites.  Both the Civetta Mountain Group to the west and the Pelmo Mountain Group to the east offer great hikes and several classic Alpine climbs.

Passo Staulanza Dolomites

GETTING TO PASSO STAULANZA, ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Passo Staulanze is located along state road 251, which runs from the town of Longarone (just north of Belluno and along the train line), to Selva di Cadore.  The road is surprising large and well maintained, and since it an upper mountain road there are no large trucks and traffic is mild on most days. 

You can reach the Passo Staulanza using the local bus service. 

If you are bike touring the area you can either start you day off by utilizing the train to reach Longarone and then riding northwest toward Done and then up to Passo Staulanza.  After Passo Staulanza descend down to Selva di Cadore where you can either continue to descend to Alleghe or climb Passo Giau and descend down to Cortina d'Ampezzo. 

If you riding from Alleghe you can ride south to Agordo then climb Passo Duran over to the town of Dont and then climb the Passo Staulanza.  The best ride is from Dont up to Passo Staulanza.

WHERE TO STAY TO EXPLORE PASSO STAULANZA
  • Alleghe
  • Dont
  • Selva Cadore
PASSO STAULANZA TRIP REPORTS

Bike Tour Passo Staulanza in the Italian Dolomites

Travel Guide to Passo Valles in the Dolomites of Italy

PASSO VALLES | DOLOMITES

Passo Valles Bike Tour

Passo Valles sits at 2032 meters a.s.l. and links Falcade with Passo Rolle, and the roads to Predazzo and Passo S. Pellegrino.  Passo Valles markes the boundary line between the Veneto Region and Trentino Alto Adige Region, once the boundary between the Austrian-Hungerina Empire and Kingdom of Italy. 

The road over the pass was built during the First World War (The Great War) inorder to move supplies to the Marmolada Mountain Group fortifications.  Today the pass is a popular destination for hikers wishing to explore the Pale di San Martino Mountain Group. For those bike touring the Italian Dolomites this is a greattransistion route to move from the Fiemme Valley to reach Passo Ceredo and the southern portions of the Italian Dolomites, or to ride north from S. Martino di Castrozza to reach Alleghe and the 4 passes Passo Pordoi, Passo Sella, Passo Gardena, and Passo Campolongo.  Passo Valles is also a good transition from the bike path in Predazzo to Alleghe over to Passo Giau. 

Passo Valles is located along the Alta Vie Dolomites 2 hiking trail. For hikers this is a great start point to several great trails, also mountian bikers will find plenty of routes starting in the pass.  You have a great view of the Pale di San Martino Mountain Group from the pass and there are plenty of small hotels and refugios to stay at in the pass.

Passo Valles Italian Dolomites

Travel Guide to Pian delle Fugazze in the Dolomites of Italy

PIAN DELLe FUGAZZE | DOLOMITES

Pian della Fugazze, Piccolo Dolomites

Pian della Fugazze sits at 1,163 meters a.s.l., and marks the border between the Veneto Region and Trentino Alto Adige Region of Italy.  The pass Pian della Fugazze divides the Pasubio Mountain Group and Monti Cornetto of the Piccolo Dolomites (Italian Dolomites). The pass connects the city of Rovereto in the Trento Province with Schio in the Vicenza Province.  The state road 46 has developed from a hiking train in the middle ages, a main transition route between the Austrian Empire and the Republic of Venezia, to a quite mountain road today.

Pian della Fugazze is a great starting point for several great hikes to explore the old battlegrounds of WW1.  Several engagements were found in the Pasubo Mountain Group and a famous resupply tunnel was built through the southern slopes, known as the 52 tunnels of Pasubio.  As a cyclist this is a great area for early season rides with plenty of challenging connections: Passo Campogrosso, Passo Xomo, Passo Brocola, and Passo Coe.

Pian della Fugazze Map

GETTING TO PIAN DELLA FUGAZZE

 

OUTDOOR RECREATION ACTIVITIES IN PIAN DELLA FUGAZZE

Tre Cime di Lavaredo Dolomites

TRE CIME DI LAVAREDO | DOLOMITES

Tre Cima di Lavaredo Dolomites

The Tre Cime di Lavaredo area peaks out at 2999 meters a.s.l., and are solidary peaks with in the Sesto Mountain Group of the Italian DolomitesTre Cime di Lavaredo marks the border between the Veneto Region and theTrentino Alto Adige Region, it also marks the boundary between the ItalianLanguage and German Language. Majority of the Tre Cime di Lavaredo area sits in the Bolzano Province, while the southern sections are in the Belluno Province.  The peak is renown for the distinctive beauty and is perhaps one of the most photographed symbols of the Italian Dolomites.  Even thought no major roads or communication lines pass over these peaks, and they are isolated from much of the local area, the peaks have held a special mystic.  The area was one of the primary battle lines in the First World War with Austrian and Italian Troops battling each other in the shadow of the Three Peaks.  Much of the surrounding landscape has a lunar appearance due to all the bombardments. 

Tre Cime di Lavaredo is a perfect destination for hikers and climbers, also cyclist will find a classic climb utilized in the Giro d'Italia on several occasions.  If you are traveling in the Italian Dolomites you should make the excursion to see this special area, though crowded during peak season, if you plan well you can enjoy the day in quite solitude.

Tre Cima di Lavaredo Dolomites, Map

GETTING TO TRE CIME DI LAVAREDO

Tre Cime di Lavaredo can be reached by Bus,  for Auronzo di Cadore in the Belluno Province of the Veneto Region, or Dobbiaco located in the Bolzano Province of the Trentino Alto Adige Region. To arrive to the base of the mountain there is a toll road that brings you up to 2320 meters a.s.l. and Refugio Auronzo.  This is the classic bike climb of Tre Cima di Lavaredo, you will want to time your ride so as not to deal with all the traffic.   To hike to the base of the mountain there are several trail options to reach the main Rifugio.

BIKE ROUTES UP TRE CIME DI LAVAREDO

Tre Cime di Lavaredo from Cortina Bike Climb

TRE CIMe DI LAVAREDO FROM CORTINA BIKE CLIMB | DOLOMITES

tre-cima-di-lavaredo

Each year visitors travel to Tre Cime di Lavaredo to test their skills in climbing, not only on the rock tower's but on the access road leading up to the "Tre Cima". Featured in the Giro d'Italiaas an individual time trail course and as a mountain top finish on a stage this climb is considered one of the top test pieces for any cyclist. This epic climb has puts hundreds of bikers to the test every year, at a total distance of 21 km and 900 dis elevation the climb does not seem to present a major challenge. However, the varying grades on short sections exceeding 15% the Tre Cima climb, will challenge the best visiting cyclist.

The road leading to the Tre Cime di Lavaredo is a private road that turns off the from the main road SS 48 a just after Lago Misurina and ends 7 km later at Refugio Auronzo, at an altitude of 2333 meters.· The hard part of the climb starts after the National Park entrance toll booth (bicycles do not have to pay the road toll).

HOW TO GET TO TRE CIMA DI LAVAREDO

There are three routes that lead reach the Tre Cime di Lavaredo climb, and all intersect at the town and mountain lake of Misurina (1761 m).

  • From Cortina it is just over 21.9 km with an average grade of 7%.
  • From Dobbiaco or Pustertal the climb to Misurina begins in Carboni, and arriving from the north on this route means you will turn off just before the Lake Misurina.
  • The third route is coming from Auronzo. This is the hardest route where you start at 863 meters in Auronzo and ride about 20 km to get the climb.

Route Profile:

From Cortina D'Ampezzo the route is 21.9 km long and has a max incline of 18%. It starts out at an easy grade as you leave Cortina and you need to ensure you do not get to excited and burn out your legs in this initial part. A couple of minutes lost here and energy saved will give you a better time near the end. The climbs difficulty is lessened, for those not going all out, by the beauty of the mountains and natural surroundings. Riding this on a weekday void of the holiday masses has been one of my top 10 climbs ever

Tre Cima Laveredo Bike Profile Doomites

The ride is exceptional and the Tre Cime di Lavaredo is a must see in Italy and the Dolomites

tre cima from cortina

 

 

 

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