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Alleghe | Veneto Region

ALLEGHE | BELLUNO PROVINCE

Since the late 19th century the Alleghe has been a renowned winter and summer resort for its splendid landscape encircled by centennial trees and the impressive crest of mount Civetta. Alleghe rises on a rocky spur extending over the Alleghe lake, which was formed on 11 January 1771 by a landslide coming from Mount Spitz that buried three hamlets, Riete, Marin and Fusine and originated a huge dam of rock and mud that blocked the valley stream, forming the lake. The population speaks a Ladin dialect.

There is a popular legend on the lake. A pilgrim, coming from from the southern village of Avoscan, in the late afternoon of 11 January 1771, tired and freezing, asked for food and a place to stay overnight but none of the villagers helped him. Only a poor widow with five children shared with him the little dinner, and offered her stable. Before going to sleep the pilgrim told them not to be afraid of some big noise in the night and to stay inside. In the night the earthquake came, but the widow and her children did not move. The following morning, the old pilgrim was gone, as well as all of the houses around them, covered by the lake.

Belluno | Veneto Region

BELLUNO | BELLUNO PROVINCE

Belluno has been a township and primary city in the mountains of the Dolomiti since Roman times, now in the old part of the town you find the Venetian influence, and nothing remains from the medieval and Roman periods. Defensive walls were built around the Roman stronghold of Belunum during the medieval period. Venetian rule began in 1404. 400 years of peace ended with Napoleaon'sarriavle in 1806. However, the town became a provincial capital of his Italic Kingdom. A major earthquake struck the area in 1873, but it did not halt the urban development. In the later part of the 19th century Piazza dei Martiri became the new town center and focal point for urban development. During the Great War from 1917-18 the area was occupied by the Austrians. In 1943 the Germans occupied the city. The city is the birthplace of Bartolomeno Alberto Cappellari, whom became Pope Gregory XVI from 1831 to 1846. Also well know Italian writer Dino Buzzati is from Belluno.

What is now the town center was first developed in the 1500's as a garden north of the old city walls. As time passed and population continued to rise the Piazza became the main center of Belluno. The square was dedicated to martyrs of the resistance, murdered by the Nazis in 1944. Within the square is the Church of S. Rocco, built in the 16th century and restored in the 19th, inside there is a well know painting of St Francis in Ecstasy (1727).

 

Bike Touring From Cortina to Cadore Path | Belluno Province

BIKE TOURING FROM CORTINA TO CADORE PATH | BELLUNO PROVINCE

bike touring cortina to cadore

This is one of the most rewarding bike trails in the Alps region.  It will bring you through landscapes recognized as UNESCO World heritage sites. Along the way, you'll go through picturesque historical towns and the splendid valley of Cortina d'Ampezzo.

Distance: 50 km
Route: bike path with sections of dirt road
Start: Passo Cimabanche, Cortina
Finish: Calalzo di Cadore
Dolomitibus offers bus + bike service for this route

Bike Touring The Belluno Province

BIKE TOURING THE BELLUNO PROVINCE

Lake Misurina Cadore Belluno

Bike riding in the Belluno province in the Veneto is one of the most spectacular places to cycle you will find in Italy.  The Belluno Province is the Heart of the Dolomite and the riding is for those who love to mountains and the joy of climbing on the bike. There are several rides at various levels of difficulty, climbs with average grades of 9% or climbs with average grades of 4%, with the right gear ratio's you can make your way though all the climbs in the Belluno province.

BIKE TOURING ROUTES IN THE BELLUNO PROVINCE

Bike Touring From Cortina to Cadore Path | Belluno Province

CLASSIC BIKE CLIMBS IN THE BELLUNO PROVINCE

BEST TIME TO RIDE

The Dolomites bike season starts in the month of May, there are chances to ride in April if it has been a dry winter, but be prepared for all types of weather.  Most of the hotels smaller ski towns will close down between 15 April until 15 May and 15 Sept until mid-November.  And during August the mountains are full of day walkers, motorcycles, and everyone just wanting to see the beauty of the peaks. 

WHERE TO STAY IN THE BELLUNO PROVINCE FOR BIKE TOURING

  • Alleghe: This is a prefect location to ride 4-5 days without having to redo the same road.
  • Arraba: Is a great place if you are only interested in doing the 4 passes, Giau loop, and Fedaia.  Other wish you have to retrace routes if you want to do more passes.
  • Cortina: Is only a good option for 2 days of riding.  From Cortina you are in prefect positon to do Tre Cima di Lavaredo. Passo Giau and Passo Falzarego loop.  then it is best to move over to Arabba or down to Alleghe. 
  • Other options to consider are Agordo, Feltre and then over in the Trento Province.

Many of these routes can be done during a one week vacation or less depending on your fitness level. If you goal is not just "pass bagging" spend the time to do the climb in multiple directions and many of the lesser known areas. Biking in Italy, and the Veneto can keep you busy during several visits and do not forget to take the time to do a hike or two.

Cadore Area of the Belluno Province

CADORE AREA | BELLUNO PROVINCE

The Cadore area is an historical region in the Italian region of Veneto, in the northernmost part of the province of Belluno bordering Austria, the Trentino Alto Adige Region and Friuli Venezia Region. It is watered by the Piave River poured forth from the Carnic Alps. Once a barren and poor district, the former contado (countship) of Cadore now has a thriving economy based on tourism to the Dolomites mountains and small manufacturing industry, specialized in the production of eye glasses.

Communities in the Cadore

Cadore is generally subdivided into Comelico, Sappada, Central Cadore and Boite Valley. The Cadore mountain community includes 22 comuni: (Cadorino dialect: Tré Thìme) and Lake Misurina (Meśorìna)

  • Auronzo di Cadore
  • Borca di Cadore
  • Calalzo di Cadore
  • Cibiana di Cadore
  • Comelico Superiore
  • Danta di Cadore
  • Domegge di Cadore
  • Lorenzago di Cadore
  • Lozzo di Cadore
  • Ospitale di Cadore
  • Perarolo di Cadore
  • Pieve di Cadore
  • San Nicolò di Comelico
  • San Pietro di Cadore
  • Santo Stefano di Cadore
  • San Vito di Cadore
  • Sappada
  • Selva di Cadore
  • Valle di Cadore
  • Vigo di Cadore
  • Vodo di Cadore
  • Zoppè di Cadore

History of the Area

Originally populated by Euganei and then by the Gauls, the area now known as Cadore was conquered by the Romans during the second century BC, and became part of the Regio X Venetia et Histria. In Late Antiquity, Cadore was occupied by many invading Germanic populations, was joined to the Duchy of Carinthia and finally, in 1077, to the Patriarchate of Aquileia.

From 1135 to 1335, Cadore was ruled by the da Camino family, styled counts of Cadore, who later became Signori of Treviso. Then it was briefly annexed to Tyrol and again to the domains of the Patriarchs of Aquileia. However, the comuni of Cadore always enjoyed a certain degrees of self-government. When the dogal Republic of Venice conquered the neighbouring Friuli region in 1420 and put an end to the temporal power of the Patriarchs, Cadore, having to choose between Venetian and Imperial allegiance, declared for the former; it became one of many parts of the Terra ferma, administered by a local podestà. The conflict between Venice and the Empire broke out again at the beginning of the 16th century, during the War of the League of Cambrai; the Venetians and Cadorines defeated Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor in 1508 at the Battle of Valle di Cadore, and again in 1509. Then, in 1511, Maximilian conquered the town of Cortina d'Ampezzo, which was once and for all assigned to the Empire in 1516. Cortina, formerly considered part of Cadore, has ever since developed a distinct identity.

Cadore remained part of the Venetian Republic until the Napoleonic War. A famous Venetian incumbent of the local post of Commisario del Cadore ('Commissioner'; in 1589) was Paolo Paruta. Napoleon I Bonaparte created it a duché grand-fief, a rare, hereditary but nominal honor of ducal rank (extinguished in 1893), for his minister and admiral Jean-Baptiste Nompère de Champagny. Being a part of the Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia, Cadore was ruled by Austria until 1866, when it was conquered by the newly formed Kingdom of Italy with the Third War of Independence.

During the First World War, Cadore was on the Alpine Front and was the scene of many battles. The celebrated Renaissance painter Titian was born in Cadore in 1477, one of a family of four born to Gregorio Vecelli, a distinguished councillor and soldier descended from the counts, and his wife Lucia. The painter's birthplace in Pieve di Cadore, in a locality named Arsenale between the castle and the village Sotto Castello, is open to visitors. Titian's wife, Cecilia, was also born in Cadore, the daughter of a barber.

Comelico Area of the Belluno Province

COMELICO AREA | BELLUNO PROVINCE

The Comelico area is a mountainous region of northeast Italy, in the Belluno Province of the Veneto Region close to the Austrian border. Comelico covers an area of circa 280 km². Encircled by the Dolomites and the Carnic Alps, it is covered by wide forests and meadows. Comelico comprises two main valleys, the upper part of Piave river and the valley of the Padola torrent. Other valleys are the Visdende valley and the Digon valley. The main mountains are the Popera, one of the most handsome and famous group of the Dolomites region, the long rock ridge that runs from the Tudaio mountain to the Tre Terze group and, in the north of the region, the long and sweet border crest that starts from the Monte Croce Comelico pass and ends on the Peralba mountain. The main village is Santo Stefano di Cadore located at the junction of the Piave and the Padola rivers. The other villages included in this region are San Pietro di Cadore, Comelico Superiore and Danta di Cadore

Comelico is mainly based on cattle-breeding and tourism. Agriculture, with the exception of fodder cultivation, is poor and limited to potatoes and various vegetables for home use. The production of eye wear is another source of income for this region but, in the last decade it has suffered a drop in the production due to lack of competitiveness.

Cortina d'Ampezzo | Veneto Region

CORTNA D'AMPEZZO | BELLUNO PROVINCE

Cortina d'Ampezzo is a town and comune in the Italian Dolomites in the Veneto Region of Northern Italy. Located in the heart of the Dolomites in an alpine valley, it is a popular winter sport resort known for its skiing trails, scenery, accommodation, shops and après-ski scene, and for its jet set and aristocratic European crowd. Although Cortina was unable to go ahead with the scheduled 1944 Winter Olympics because of the Second World War, it hosted the Winter Olympics in 1956 and subsequently a number of world winter-sports events. Several films have been shot in the town, mostly notably The Pink Panther (1963) and For Your Eyes Only (1981).

Cortina is situated more or less in the centre of the Ampezzo valley, at the top of the Valle del Boite in the Dolomites, which encircle the town. The mountains in the area are described as "craggy" and "soaring", "unmistakable; like a massive coral reef ripped from the sea, strung with conifers and laced with snow". The town is positioned between Cadore (to the south) and the Puster Valley (to the north), Val d' Ansiei (to the east) and Agordo (to the west). Originally it consisted of numerous frazioni, isolated villages and hamlets, but from the 1950s it grew rapidly as a result of tourism. Only the most remote villages have remained isolated from the main town. San Vito di Cadore is to the south of Cortina d'Ampezzo.

Among the surrounding mountains are Tofane to the west, Pomagagnon to the north, Cristallo to the northeast, Faloria and Sorapis to the east, and Becco di Mezzodì, Croda da Lago and Cinque Torri to the south. The town centre is located at an elevation of , although the highest summit is that of the Tofana di Mezzo, which towers at . There is a significant water presence in the territory, consisting of fast flowing rivers, streams and small lakes (Ghedina, Pianozes,d'Ajal), which fill particularly during the summer snow-melt season. Fauna include marmots, roe deer, chamois and hares.

Located in the Dolomites, probably among the three most exclusive mountain sport resorts in Europe, Cortina (Petsch-Hayden in German) is known for its first-class hotels and the shops which line Corso Italia.

It was the host town of the 1956 Winter Olympic, and its astounding landscape, surrounded on all sides by the Dolimites, were the location for movies like Cliffhanger and The Pink Panther.

Crepe Basse sector | Climbing Belluno Province

CREPE BASSE CLIMBING AREA | BELLUNO

The Crepe basse sits in the middle of the wood near the city of Cortina d'Ampezzo. Perfect place in summer, the routes arrange around 6c but very high.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

Crepe Basse Climbing Guide

REGION Veneto
PROVINCE Belluno
GEOGRAPHY Cortina d'Ampezzo
BEST TIME OF YEAR
summer
ROCK limestone
NUMBER OF ROUTES
81
RANGE OF GRADES
from 4a to 7c
HEIGHT 20-25m

routes

From left to right

Zachetac 6b
Sei a millesei 6b
Senza nome 6c
Senza nome 6c
Non c'è tanga che tenga 6c
Cielo duro 6b
Nessuno che rompe 6b
Tettona 6c
Regno di ragno 6b
Cosce che capitano 6b
Primo pelo 6b
Souplesse 6a+
Yabba dabba doo 7a
Busillis 6b
Curve peligrosi 7a
Stress da sas 6c
Senza nome 7a
Visita parenti 5b
Zanzare a zonzo 5b
Fun tomas 5a
Piche peche 4a
Escluso autoveicoli 4a
Troppa troppa 7a
Topless 6b
Stai zitto che non sei altro 6b+
Palle al balzo 6b
Senza nome 6b
Ochi pochiti 5b
Gomma piuma 4b
Promenade 5a
Tipa al top 5b
33 Marzo 6c
Senza nome 6b+
Hoo issa 7c
Senza nome 6c
Senza nome 6c
Sex appeal 7a
Tutto pepe 6c+
Sorci verdi 6b
Uso del buso 6c+
Miss popa 6a
Sembra facile ma non è difficile 6c
Ostrega che mona 6b
Finta di niente 6a
Kappa o 6c
Overdose 6c
Patatrac 6c
Senza nome 6b
Mezza per parte 5a
Follie 7a
Uscita dai gangheri 6c
Brodo di giuggiole 6c
Ghereghereghez 6b
Augh 6b
Senza nome 6c
Senza nome 7a
Buco nell'azona 7a
Paraponzi ponzi pò 6b
Fluido magico 6c
Insostenibile leggerezza 6b+
Trucco di fix 6c
Palpa al centro 6c
Hey bionda 6c
Colta in fallo 6c
Birra media 6c
Poppe a pera 6b
Prese di petto 6c
Spirito di patata 6a+
E così via 6b
Uffa 6b
Mal de panza 6c
Boja chi molla  7a
Gulp 6c
Non plus ultra 6c
Slip slip urrà! 6c
Falsa partenza 6c
Cazzi miei 6b
Ghirigori 4b
Come giovedì 5a
Vespe vispe 5b
Ullallà 6a

Crepe d'Oucera sector | Climbing Belluno Province

CREPE D'OUCERE CLIMBING AREA | BELLUNO

The Crepe d'Oucera it'a a good place to get away from the most popular walls. You can do a good warming up in the first sector, but to climb there you will need agility and strnght in your fingers. In the other two sectors you can challange your resistance.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

Crepe d'Oucere Climbing Guide

REGION Veneto
PROVINCE Belluno
GEOGRAPHY Cortina d'Ampezzo
BEST TIME OF YEAR
from April to November
ROCK dolomite
NUMBER OF ROUTES
54
RANGE OF GRADES
from 5a to 8a+
HEIGHT 18-30m

routes

From right to left

Didò 5a
Momo 5c
Go go 6a
Snorki 6a
White line 6b
Uomini gatto 6b
Klamera 6c
Melassa 6b
P38 6a+
Latte acido 6b+
Panada 5a
Fedora 6a
Pikindolor 6c
Profumo di donna 6c
Odore di sudore 6c
Delirio cosmico 6a
Cuba libre 7b+
Gin fizz 7b+
Senza nome 7a+
Tequila gold 7a
Lemon vodka 7b
Whisky and soda 7a
Magica armonia 7b+
Schizofrenica follia 7c+
Patapunfete 7a+
Fisiognomica 8a+
Rebus 7b+
Spittaggio confuso 6c
Senza nome 7a+
Senza nome 7b
Senza nome 7b+
Senza nome 6c+
Babuska 7a+
Sesso perverso 7b+
Delta force 7b+
Spit rossi 7c/c+
Attiti babao 8a+
Senza nome 7c
Arcobaleno 7b+
Spigolo 7b+
Diedro 6b+
Polifemo 7a+
Depressione 7b+
Serpente piumato  
Senza nome 6b+
Senza nome 6b+
Senza nome 6b+
Senza nome 6c
Senza nome  
Senza nome  
Polvere  
Dita di burro 7b+
Senza nome 7b+
Ultima tentazione 7b+
Senza nome 7a+

Falesia di Mesaroz | Guida di arrampicata in provincia di Belluno

FALESIA DI MESAROZ | BELLUNO PROVINCE

La falesia di Mesaroz nasce da una frana di 2kmq, ai piedi del monte Cima Pape. Si compone di nove aree, ognuna di uno o due massi, dislocate nel bosc ai piedi del monte, raggiungibili dal paesino di Chioit. Lo stile di scalata è molto vario, sia a causa della mutazione dell'inclinazione della parete sia della morfologia dei sassi, e permette quindi di sbizzarrirsi su itinerari di varia lunghezza.

Questa guida vuole aiutare i novizi arrampicatori. Per informazioni più aggiornate consigliamo sempre di prendere la guida della zona.

GUIDA ALLA FALESIA DI MESAROZ

REGIONE Veneto
PROVINCIA Belluno
ZONA IN CUI E' SITUATO Bogo
PERIODO IDEALE da maggio ad ottobre
TIPO DI ROCCIA calcarea
CHIODATURA molto buona
NUMERO DI VIE 52
GRADO DI DIFFICOLTA' da 5c a 7c+
ALTEZZA PARETE 10-20m
ATTREZZATURA CONSIGLIATA 10 rinvii
GUIDA  

VIE DELLA FALESIA

Da sinistra a destra

Pink Floyd ?
Rock'n'roll ?
Samba 7a
Ballo del qua qua 7b
Flamengo 7a
Tango 7a+
Valzer 7a+
Liscio 7a+
Polka  
Passo double 7b
Mazurca  
Ranieri superstar 6b
Ghiri gori 5c
La cresta del gallo 6b
Mani di fata 7b
C'era una volta 6c
Calpital game 6c
Mi e ti 6a+
Gli antenati 6a+
Rock story 6c+
Nazgul 7a+
Luna park 7a+
Tornado  
Tutto storto 7c
Grasa 7b+
Boia 6c+
Slaia 7a+
Sgaia  
Fringuello  
Upupa 6c
Cincia bigia  
Crosnober 7a+
Passera scopaiola 7b+
Lucherino 5c
Cuculo 5c
Malaria 6c
Cancrena 7a+
Lebbra 7c+
Colera 6b+
Opossum 6b+
Trazione integrale 7a
Arti marziali 7b
Zarch 5c
Incenso 6b
Oro 5c
Mirra 6a
Madona 5c
Catechismo 5b
Cobra 6c+
Mamba 7b+
Boa  
Pitone  

Falesia di Sasso di Caleda - Pera | Guida di arrampicata in provincia di Belluno

FALESIA DI SASSO DI CALEDA | BELLUNO PROVINCE

La falesia di Caleda-Pera sbuca dal manto erboso e da essa sgorga acqua di sorgente, raccolta in un abbeveratoio che funge da fontana. Le vie sono ricche di altezze e stili differenti e il settore è ben mantenuto, impegnamoci quindi a tenerlo pulito!

Questa guida vuole aiutare i novizi arrampicatori. Per informazioni più aggiornate consigliamo sempre di prendere la guida della zona.

GUIDA ALLA FALESIA DI Caleda - pera

REGIONE Veneto
PROVINCIA Belluno
ZONA IN CUI E' SITUATO Agordo
PERIODO IDEALE estate
TIPO DI ROCCIA dolomia
CHIODATURA molto buona
NUMERO DI VIE 28
GRADO DI DIFFICOLTA' da 6a a 8a
ALTEZZA PARETE 10-20m
ATTREZZATURA CONSIGLIATA 10 rinvii
GUIDA  

VIE DELLA FALESIA

Da sinistra a destra

Raspa climb ?
Il ritorno di Sergio 7a+
Makonde 7b
Baboska 7b
Donna Diavolo 7a
Jenna 7b
Donald Duck 7b+
Dolomia Tremulis 7a+
Miss Caleda 7c+
Stati di agitazione 6c+
Ivan Desinovich 6c+
El Cumbre 6c
Buena suerte 6b+
Olof 7a+
Soweto 6c+
Garibaldi zoo 6c+
Stanislao Mowlinski 6b
Niagara 6a
Pentarello 6b
Senza nome ?
Acida ?
Uomo finito 6a
Calcolo numerico 6b
Crimini del cuore 6c
Stone Haven 7a+
La minorenne 7a+
Ecce Homo 7b+
Ghisao 8a

Feltre | Veneto Region

FELTRE | BELLUNO PROVINCE

Feltre - This is one of the cities of Italy that has best conserved its ancient appearance. The city was rebuilt shortly after the destruction, in 1510 by the troops of Emperor Maximilian. The best way to appreciate the artistic design of the city is walk along the steep street of Via Mezzaterra, which divides it in two parts and is flanked by an interrupted series of 16th-century houses and palazzi with frescoed facades and protruding roofs. The street also leads to one of the most harmonious squares in Italy: the old Piazza Maggiore, which is dominated by the Venetian lion on a column with statues of Vittorino da Feltre and Panfilo Castaldi, the towers of the castle, and the Church of San Rocco.

There is a fountain designed by Tullio Lombardo and, on the opposite side, are Palazzo dei Rettori, which has a Palladian portico with ashlar pilasters (inside is a charming theater in which Goldoni - judiciary chancellor of Feltre gave his first plays), the elegant Palazzo del Comune, and other houses with porticos and loggias. There are interesting art works displayed in the Duomo and other churches of Feltre and in the civic museum, located in Palazzo Villabruna, which contains works by illustrious artists from Feltre like Lorenzo Luzzo (Dead Man of Feltre) and Pietro Mariscalchi and other works by Gentile Bellini, Cima da Conegliano, Palma the Younger, Francesco Maffei, Sebastiand Mazzoni, Marco Ricci, and other Venetian and Flemish painters. The museum also contains important archeological finds,cippi, and fragments of Roman tombstones, including an altar dedicated to Anna Perenna. Another palazzo (the former Palazzo Cumano) in Via del Paradiso houses the Galleria Rizzarda, which was donated along with the palazzo to the city of Feltre, by the master of wrought iron CarloRizzarda. The gallery also contains an interesting collection of paintings from the 18th and early 19 century's.

Visitors to Feltre should not miss climbing to the Sanctuary of Santi Vittore e Corona. It is located on a spur of Monte Miesna and dominates the entrance to the city for those coming from the plain. The sanctuary contains the tomb of the martyrs and - in the sacristy -the sarcophagus of the founder, Giovanni da Vidor, which is held by columns with finely decorated capitals.

Food To Look For In The Belluno Province of Italy

FOOD OF THE BELLUNO PROVINCE

The vast green mass of land next to the Dolomites is the perfect habitat for outdoor cattle farming, and it is possible to obtain excellent raw materials to make exquisite high-quality specialties. Ancient techniques, practised with love do the rest. The main ingredients of Belluno’s cuisine are simplicity and genuineness, together with delicious cheese, excellent meat and tasty cold cuts.  And, obviously, there is the main ingredient of the Venetian art of cooking: polenta. It can be a single course or perfectly served with a slice of Casél dell’Agordino, Contrin, Nevegal or Casalingo d’Alpago, great local dairy products.

Polenta can also be served with a slice of exquisite speck ham of Cadore or salame from the Belluno area, both of them made with the meat from Alpine reared cattle.  Another typical dish that reflects traditional local flavors is polenta served with game.  For any other combination it is worthwhile exploring the area of Belluno and taste the original and exquisite recipes of the locals.

Amongst the traditional specialties there is kodinzon, a jam made with dried apples from local cultivation. The apples are cooked to obtain a purée, then dried; the Pastin, flat meat balls made with sausage then fried or grilled.  Another good recipe is the Risotto Lamonese, called “the food of the poets,” with exquisite Lamon beans flavoured with bay leaves.

History of City of Belluno

HISTORY OF THE CITY OF BELLUNO

The town of Belluno has a long history of settlements, in spite of the fact that it has always been a quite inaccessible geographic area; it was still a transit path, through the valley of the river Piave, for the populations moving from the planes to the alpine valleys, looking for both metal veins and new ways to cross the Alps.

It is certain that, at some stage, the settlements in Belluno and its surrounding area became stable, because the region was quite sheltered and easy to defend. Archaeological findings testify a human presence already during the Stone Age; however, more important findings concern the settlements of the "paleoveneti" (Indo-European population from Asia Minor) both in the planes of Veneto and along the course of the river Piave. Such findings include the necropolis of Mel, the archaeological sites in Cavarzano and Fisterre, and the important site of Lagole (Calalzo). The latter was discovered in 1881, when eighty graves were found; however, the bronze burial outfits were completely destroyed during WW I.

The "paleoveneta" culture, flourishing in the Belluno area during the 5th century B.C, differs from that of the plains in many aspects, including the linguistic one (see G.B. Pellegrini). Many findings testify Celtic influences on the area and openings towards the Isonzo valley. Regarding the "celtic link" to the north of the Alps, the findings consist in armor pieces like helms and swords (Cadore); on the other hand, the relations with the eastern Celts (in Friuli) are testified by the finding of "torques" (rigid necklaces) and the fibula with sphinx from Cavarzano (such findings do not have counterparts from the plains). Several of the findings from the "paleoveneto" culture can be seen in the civic museum (Museo Civico) of Belluno and in other museums of the province.

During the following centuries, the Celtic populations moved south, to Belluno and beyond.

Very likely, the "ferae" populations that the Romans drove back north in their conquest of the alpine regions were Celtic. Starting from Aquileia in 181 B.C., the roman conquest proceeded slowly and peacefully: given its anti-celtic character, it did not meet with hostility from the people of Belluno, who had a local, non-celtic culture. The first contacts with the Belluno area were eminently commercial, as the Romans were in need of iron and copper.

During the times of Augustus (the former Octavius), Belluno became a "municipium" following Feltre and the Cadore, and it became part of the "X Regio Venetia et Histria". As the "municipium" fell into decline, Belluno was put under central imperial authority. The roman remains are today abundant: from burial stones (the most famous is that of Flavius Ostilius, now kept in Crepadona), to the aqueducts (like the Fisterre one); from the coins to the monumental inscriptions (second and third century A.D.).

From the remaining documents, we believe that Belluno must have enjoyed a certain degree of autonomy from Rome. It was governed by the "quattuorviri jure dicendo" (high magistrates) and from the council of elders, and a "union" of timber transporters was present, which has survived to the present times as an association of rafters. In the roman age, fir rafts, loaded with larch, minerals and building stones, descended from the alpine rivers to the Po river and to the harbour of Ravenna. This activity, linked to the timber of the Belluno area, developed since the first imperial age, as is testified by documents found in Feltre and Belluno (2nd-4th century A.D.).

The "romanisation" phenomenon radically changed the landscape: with the subdivision of the farming territory in several quadrangular parts (centuriae), new lands were reclaimed and cultivated; canals were built, woods were cut down and roads were built to the estates. Each "centuria" was assigned either to romans or to native people, who became the landlords. The first landlords have often given their family name to their estate: "Cavarzano" derives from Capertianum (Capertia family state), while "Vezzano" derives from the Vettianum family.The roman castrum corresponds to the oldest part of Belluno, situated on a south-sloped river terrace, between the riverbeds of the Ardo and the Piave; the forum was situated in the modern "Piazza delle Erbe" (Place of Herbs); in the neighbouring area, important settlements were those of Cavarzano and Fisterre. It should be noted that the coincidence of the roman town with the modern one makes it difficult to discover the original urban structure; it is however known that the structure of the castrum was left unchanged until the end of the 10th century. After 475 A.D., Belluno followed the fate of the Roman Empire, and was subject to barbaric invasions.

The Middle Age

Following the fall of the Roman Empire, Belluno was subject to the invasions of barbaric populations: Visigoths, Vandals, Huns (Attila), Ostrogoths (Teodorico) and others. Such events certainly did change the shape of the town. As Teodorico died in 553 A.D., Belluno became Byzantine.

The Byzantines in the Belluno area carried on with the construction of the defense system that Teodorico had started to build with the longobardic menace in his mind. In fact, during 568 A.D., the Longobards reached Belluno on their way to Friuli, and then occupied the plains (Vicenza, Verona).

The Longobards fortified Belluno further, as they considered it to be an important basis against the Byzantines who were menacing them from the sea, and against the Frankish coming from the northwest. "As Bellunum became, under longobardic rule, seat of a "Sculdascia" (a longobardic administrative district that controlled the various settlements scattered on the territory; such settlements were based upon the so called "farie" or "decanie", i.e. groups of ten families), a first rudimentary castle was built on the northern side, on an advanced position with respect to the roman vallum; following the longobardic custom, this castle was called "Dongion" or "Motta". These names continued to indicate the lord of the castle and the gates (the Doglioni) and the opposite square." (Mario Dal Mas, PRA: Storia di un borgo, Unione Artigiani della Provincia di Belluno, Belluno 1978). 
According to the local historians, civil life found in this period a certain equilibrium: the "romanisation" and the conversion to the catholic faith made cohabitation and mixing of the two populations possible in Belluno.

The long-lasting longobardic permanence in Belluno has left many traces in the toponymy (Farra…), in the language, and in the form of archeological findings.
"It is almost certain that Belluno, with the neighbour towns of Friuli, has long resisted an invasion by the Frankish, together with the longobardic Dukes, before accepting the rule of Charlemagne" (B. Zanenga).

In order to weaken the vast and strong dukedoms, the Frankish divided the territory in counts and marchlands and relied more on the Bishops than on the too-powerful nobles. Aimone was the first Bishop-Count to be given power over the estates of the Church in the Belluno area.

With the establishment of the aristocratic rule of the Bishop-Count, the mediaeval town, with a castle, walls, gates and towers, takes form. This past is nowadays documented by scarce archeological findings, but is depicted rather well in many ancient prints. In the same period, an organization of the internal spaces of the town took place: the square of the Cathedral and the Palace of the Bishops (now an auditorium), the market place (now Piazza delle Erbe, was the in the Middle Ages the center for all commercial activities), the districts around the mansions of the local lower-ranking nobles, the street plan around the principal north-south axis of Via Mezzaterra.

Almost one century afterwards, Belluno is under the rule of the warlike bishop Giovanni II, who fortified the town and extended its domain to the plains. In this period, the bases for the municipal evolution were established: this process was to be completed in the 14th century, with the appearance of the figure of the Podestà.
During one of the frequent wars with Treviso, under the rule of the Bishop-Counts in 1196, a battle song of victory was written that is considered by the historians of literature as the first poetic document in Italian vulgar tongue.

During the following period, until the spontaneous submission to Venice (1404), Belluno was repeatedly invaded by the neighboring towns: Ezzelino da Romano (Treviso), the Scaligeri from Verona, the De Carrara from Padova, the Visconti and so forth in a long sequel of political changes that made the government of the town quite unstable. 

Venezian Rule

In 1420, an act of union with Venice was defined, and from that year on the fate of the Belluno area followed that of Venice until its final fall; in 1797, with the Campoformio treaty, the Veneto region was annexed by Austria. This long period of beneficial peace had been interrupted by the war of the Cambrais League (1508-1512, a struggle between Venice and Maximillian I of Hapsburg). Our town was a victim of war calamities more than any other town in Veneto: the whole province was turned into a charred battlefield. 
The spontaneous annexation to Venice entailed a treaty with which Venice respected and accepted the existing political structures of Belluno, mainly the Nobles Council. It took a long time before Venice deprived those institutions of their political value, totally replacing them. The rule of Venice was inspired by pragmatism and conservatism. "Political autonomy was an excuse not to carry out any development policy in the Belluno area: the latter was valued by Venice mostly for its enviable strategic position (from Belluno, it was possible to defend the plains of Veneto in their totality from north).

Venice was also interested in the raw materials of the Belluno area: timber and minerals that provided a cheap naval activity and low-cost manufacture (wood, wrought iron). One could say that the attitude of Venice was more inspired by exploitation than by development. For the sake of clarity, it should be noted that the attitude of Venice was the logical consequence of its conservative government. In return, Venice gained loyalty, especially from the farmers and the common people, who did not gain anything, but did nonetheless regard Venice as an intermediary figure, capable of defending their rights". (Gigetto De Bortoli, in Belluno: storia architettura arte, Istituto Bellunese di Ricerche Sociali e Culturali Serie "Varie" - N.9, Belluno 1984).

In this period, the urban texture renewed itself as new houses and palaces were built by the nobles and the new born burgeoisie, in a new climate which was favoured by the intense relationship with Venice (commerce of timber and swords); the city expanded itself northwards beyond the walls, merged itself with the smaller towns along the two rivers on the south and the east, where forges, tanneries, sawmills and mills were built.

The "Palazzo dei Nobili" (demolished in the 18th century) and the "Palazzo dei Rettori" (end of the 15th century, nowadays a prefecture) left in the square of the Cathedral the signature of the architecture from Venice.

The constant relation with Venice is documented, from the 16th century onwards, also by the work of the artists from Belluno, who frequented the workshops in Venice and brought back strong cultural influences (especially Tiziano).

Many were the artists, poets, scientists and men of culture in general that, from the 16th century to the era of the Habsburg rule "brought honor to the Belluno fatherland". 

We can only list a few: Piero Valeriano (1447) tutor and writer (he has written on the flow of the river Piave from its source to its mouth); Francesco Frigimelica the Elder, a painter working between the end of the 16th century and 1646, who elaborated a personal and valuable pictorial style that elevated him above his contemporaries; Tito Livio Burattini (Agordo 1617 - Krakow 1681), mathematician, physicist, architect; Andrea Brustolon (1622 - 1732), the most celebrated woodcarver from Veneto in the 18th century; Sebastiano Ricci (Belluno 1659 – Venice 1734) one of the greatest european painters (his nephew Marco (1676 - 1730) was also a noteworthy painter, specialised in landscapes); Gaspare Diziani (Belluno 1689 - Venice 1767), whose frescos can be admired in the Cathedral; Gerolamo Segato (Vedana 1792 – Florence 1836) who owes his fame to a technique to petrify human and animal tissues (still shrouded by mystery), but also to his archeological research in Egypt. Other names should be added to this list; more information can be found in the following pages.

The Piave Riverwas, during these centuries, the most important commercial way (rafts) to transport the timber from the woods of Cadore to Venice, where it served the activities of the craftsmen. Several ports and sawmills were also built along the flow of the river.

The Austrian rule

Following the short period of Napoleonic rule (1797-1815), in which Belluno was made "Department of Piave", Belluno was annexed by Austria.

During 1806, a French law was introduced, with a new territorial subdivision which drew the borders of the current province with the only exception of the area of Livinallongo (Colle S. Lucia and Cortina remained a part of Austria). 

The first "Councillor of the Royal Government" officially took his position, in the name of the Emperor of Austria, Franz I, in February 1816. The Habsburg rule lasted fifty years, until the third Independence War, with the parenthesis of 1848, when even Belluno arose (especially in Cadore, with Pier Fortunato Calvi) and proclaimed itself free town of the reborn republic of Venice. The insurrection ended when Venice surrendered in 1849.

"The people of Belluno made an Italian choice, because they felt that they belonged to the Italian nation and because they had soon understood that the Belluno province, in the eyes of the Empire, did not have great political, economic or military value, and was not therefore considered worthy of development plans. The people from Belluno felt they were being put aside." (Gigetto De Bortoli). 

The Austrian rule was much more careful and vigilant than that of Venice: within certain limits, it respected the specific characters of the social administration of Belluno, decentralizing the tasks. "Old people regret the strict but swift Austrian administration." (G. De Bortoli).

Austria promoted public works; especially the development of means of communication between the different parts of the province and between the province itself and the planes of Veneto. Among the important constructions: Palazzo Cappellari in Campitello (accomodating nowadays the offices of ACI, the Italian Automobile Club), the social theater in Piazza della Legna (also known as Campedelet, nowadays Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II) and the new town hall (1836) - with the frescos by Giovanni De Min, a painter from Belluno. All these building were designed by the architect Giuseppe Segusini. During 1816, Belluno was granted the title of "città regia" (royal city): with this new rank, new embellishment projects were added to the existing building projects, like project for a large fountain (designed also by Segusini). The Campitello finally became a Piazza (square) and took the name of "Piazza del Papa" (square of the Pope), in celebration of Gregorio XVI, who was from Belluno.

In the meanwhile, a certain population growth took place, giving raise to the emigration phenomenon that had its maximum in the last years of the 19th century and lasted, with varying intensity, until the end of the Italian "economic boom". Austria offered many opportunities to work in the construction of railways and employed workers from Belluno and Friuli alike. The people who worked at the construction of such railways were known as "esanponari", from the German word "eisenbahn", which means railway.
Because of the demographic growth, more and more houses were built in the province, and many small towns appeared on the mountainside, even in almost inaccessible areas. 

The town of Belluno was strongly linked with its province by a series of urban transformations, including the construction of new bridges on the Piave (1841) and the Ardo (1831), the demolition of the outer walls (and the filling of the ditch). The old town was also linked to the northern districts (the old "Campedel", a small field which originally lied outside the walls), in which all commercial activities took place, while the administrative offices remained in the square of the Cathedral. 

The Italian government

In 1866 Belluno, together with Veneto, became part of the Kingdom of Italy: the new administrative from Piemonte took the place of the old austrian one (which was more efficient). The burgeoisie of Belluno, quite enthusiast about the annexation to Italy was also politically very naive, because of the many years of servitude to Venice and Austria. The administration was not capable of defining a clear farming policy: the farmers remained extremely poor, and no increase in production took place.

A phase of slow social and economic decline started, in which the province of Belluno became more and more isolated from the rest of Veneto. Because of the lack of new investments, the phenomenon of emigration gradually increased, reaching its maximum towards the end of the century.

The emigrants moved to the more developed France, Belgium and Germany; however, many people went as far as Argentina, Brazil and northern America. It was an emigration of epic proportions, marked by great difficulties and immense sacrifices: in many cases, those emigrating to America were victims of ruthless people and ended almost in the condition of slavery. "Those who lost America" is a book written by the descendants of the people who left Veneto and Friuli to move to Argentina and reports the tale of their fates.

Emigration was the cause of social desegregation and made the regions the emigrants left even more poor: the human resources that are necessary to start and maintain any development were totally lacking. Belluno suffered from population decrease more than any other province in Veneto (including Rovigo); this phenomenon has slowed down considerably any process of economic emancipation.

Among the positive aspects of the union to Italy: the diffusion of primary education, the bridge on the river Piave (1884), the railway (1886), the military district (1909). Nonetheless, it was mostly up to the people of Belluno to develop locally forms of collaboration to face the dire straits. 
The "Asilo Cairoli" (a nursery) was open mostly to the children of the workers. Don Antonio Sperti took care of the orphans, leading them towards study or work in his workshop, which was built with the support of the town council and the help of donations.

Belluno was on the front line during WWI, as many towns of the province were involved in military operations and the city itself was in the zone behind the front.

After the Caporetto defeat, Belluno was subject to a very hard occupation, had to face starvation and the spreading of diseases such as tuberculosis and pellagra that decimated the population, and especially the young.

During the post-war period, the emigration phenomenon was quite prominent, until the rise of fascism that limited it during the years, not because of a better quality of life, but for its political agenda. The autarchic policy brought on by the fascist regime was harmful for the economy of Belluno, a city poor of resources.

In Belluno, public squares got an important political role, as they became the places where totalitarism was most celebrated.
"The theater was a common meeting point, not just the place where one could best show his social status. Several opera seasons were organised (...). Theatre was not neglected either (...). Movie projections were organised for the students, with "instructive" movies (...)." (F. Vendramini, Da una guerra mondiale all'altra, in Piazza dei Martiri - Campedel, I.S.B.R.E.C., Belluno 1993).

During WWII, the people of Belluno paid a terrible toll of blood and, by the end of the war, a very extensive migration took place, especially towards european countries (coal mines in Belgium etc.), but also to Argentina and Australia as in the past. During the post-war years, a slow industrialisation took place that became more significant after the Vajont disaster, with the help of the reconstruction laws. Agricolture, that had always been neglected to some degree, had a crisis, while tourism was enhanced. In Belluno, the service sector got a preminent role, and for a long period the resources were managed from outside (electric energy, but also mass tourism with the inevitable devastation of the territorial equilibria).

One of the great resources of the people of Belluno is their exceptional will to work; a resource that cannot be fully employed as long as human resources are taken away by migration. Perhaps something has changed today: the industrial crisis of the 70's and the 80's, with the decentralization that followed, has benefitted areas like that of Belluno. Manufacturies like Costan and Zanussi moved in the Belluno area. The greater productivity of small factories, in times in which the market demands are constantly changing and the technological evolution makes structures rapidly obsolete, has encouraged the diffusion of highly specialised manufacturies (spectacles) and the diffusion of small but technologically advanced crafts (see the industrial area in Paludi in Alpago).

Igne sector | Climbing Belluno Province

IGNE ROCK CLIMBING AREA | BELLUNO

Igne sector is surrounded by a small wood and the atmosphere is tranquil. The routes instead are builted up as a continuos changing of style of climbing that makes the first approach anything but easy.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

IGNE ROCK CLIMBING GUIDE

REGION

Veneto

PROVINCE Belluno
GEOGRAPHY Igne
BEST TIME OF YEAR
from October to March
ROCK limestone
NUMBER OF ROUTES
29
RANGE OF GRADES
from 5c to 7c+
HEIGHT 25m

routes

From right to left

Off limits 7a
Achung banditen 7c
Animal Hamaguchi 7c
Chico Mendez 8a
Tony Hinoki 8a+
Movimenti tellurici 8c
Mastro lindo 8b
Mamorinco 7a+
Look dell'uomo taloc 8a
Topocho 6c
Pocho gigio 8a
I fratelli Bolivar 6b+
Skorpion 6a+
Avulso vital 7c
Ve denunce 7c
Bradipo 7a+
Jack bionde 7a
Buck la peste 6c+
Lothar 8b
Mandrake 7c
Eccebombo 7b+
Sgarba igenica 7b
La prozela da scaotes 7c
Magna pupole 6c
Amorino 6b+
Harold 6b
Fred Buscaglione 6c+
Pacho street 6c+
Gaibur 7a
Aspis 6c
Pupi pupi 7a
Polenta e sciavis 7a+
Ti rullo di cartoni 7a
Ipersuini 7b+
Mungi mungi 6c+
Il ritorno di Bonimba 6c+
Il figlio di Lumumba 7a+
Little tonno 7c+
Riders on the storm 8a+
Stormy days 7c+
W i scarpet 7c+

Laggio Alta sector | Climbing Belluno Province

LAGGIO ALTO ROCK CLIMBING AREA | BELLUNO

Laggio alta sector, near Laggio di Cadore, offers three different styles of climbing.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

Laggio Alto Climbing Guide

REGION Veneto
PROVINCE Belluno
GEOGRAPHY Laggio di Cadore
BEST TIME OF YEAR
from May to October
ROCK limestone
NUMBER OF ROUTES
27
RANGE OF GRADES
from 6a to 8a
HEIGHT 20-30m

routes

From left to right

Amadeus 7a
Stress dance 7a
Specchio di Lea 6a
Rambo Rolando  
Transiberiana 7c
Sika 7b+
? 7c
Toio l'avvoltoio 7a
Polenta e osei 7a+
? 7c+
? 7b+
? 7c
?  
? 7c+
? 7b
? 6a
Raindogs 7b
? 7b
? 7b+
Art bizzarre 7c+
? 7b
? 7b+
? 7c
Kharma 7c
Ipazia 8a
U2 7b
? 7b

Livinallongo del Col di Lana | Veneto Region

LIVINALLONGO DEL COL DI LANA | BELLUNO PROVINCE

Livinallongo del Col di Lana, Province of Belluno, Veneto, Italy is a community in the valley of the Cordevole river, below the steep, snowy cliffs of the eastern Alps, and is formed of 29 hamlets. It is a fine winter and summer resort, with views of astounding beauty over Mount Civetta (3218 m), Pelmo (3168 m), Marmolada (3342 m) and the Sella Group with the pyramid-shaped summit of Mount Boé (3151 m). The population speaks a Ladin language, and the area is renowned for the production of exquisite cheeses, such as the Renaz, Cherz and Fodòm. The skiing facilities and many of the hotels are located in the mountain locality called Arabba.

First mentioned as Buchenstein Livinallongo in 1027, in a donation by Emperor Conrad II to the Bishop of Bressanone. It belonged to Austria until the end of the First World War. The Col di Lana was war theatre until November 1917, the over 8,000 Italian soldiers who died here gave it the name of "Col di Sangue".

WHAT TO SEE

  • the Museo Ladino Fodom at Pieve di Livinallongo, an important ethnographic collection of the Fodom culture, still proudly cherished both in the language and in the costume. On 15th august on the occasion of the festival of Santa Maria Maiou the ladies of the area take to the church baskets of flowers fo the blessing, wearing the typical Guant da fodoma, consisting of a heavy black skirt, velvet decorated sleeves, a flowered scarf on the shoulders, a black hat with an ostrich feather and black silk ribbon, and a short red coral necklace. After the blessing of the flowers, part of them are spread over the hay.

Mesaroz sector | Climbing Belluno Province

MESAROZ ROCK CLIMBING AREA | BELLUNO

Mesaroz sector was originated from a landslide of 2kmq of Monte Pape. There are nine areas with one or two rocks, each area requires a different climbing style.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

MESAROZ CLIMBING GUIDE

REGION Veneto
PROVINCE Belluno
GEOGRAPHY Bogo
BEST TIME OF YEAR
from May to October
ROCK limestone
NUMBER OF ROUTES
52
RANGE OF GRADES
from 5c to 7c+
HEIGHT 10-20m

routes

From left to right

 

Passo Duran | Dolomites

PASSO DURAN | DOLOMITES

Passo Duran Dolomites

Passo Duran sits at 2546 meters a.s.l. and separates the Civetta Mountain Group and the Schiara Mountain Group of the Italian Dolomites.  Passo Duran is located in the Belluno Province of the Veneto Region and connects Agordo with the Zoldo Valley. Arriving at the pass from the western side, the town of Agordo, you see one of the classic views of the Bellunese Dolomites. 

Passo Duran is one of the classic bike tours in Italy and should be on your list of places to ride.  The pass is also is a start point or transition point to many of the great hikes in the Dolomites.  Not having bus service means that the pass is quiet and off the beaten path of large groups of tourist.  The Moiazza mountain sits to the north of the pass and there are several great vie Ferrate and Alpine climbs to explore.

 Passo Duran Dolomites

GETTING TO PASSO DURAN

Passo Duran can be reached by car, bike, or foot.  There is no public transportation up to the pass the closest you can get is either by bus to Agordo, or by bus to Forno di Zoldo.  The closest you can reach Passo Duran by train is Belluno or Longarone. 

BIKE TOURING PASSO DURAN

The best way to ride Passo Duran is to base yourself in Agordo, Arabba, Cortina, or Belluno and make a loop ride.  A great day of riding if you are unsupported is to ride over and back from Agordo.   Typically you want to ride down the valley of Agordo due to traffic and the amount of tunnels, passes nearby that you can ride over are Passo Ceredo, Passo Staulanza and Passo Giau.

Bike Tour Passo Duran | Italian Dolomite

Passo Mauria sector | Climbing Belluno Province

PASSO MAURIA ROCK CLIMBING AREA | BELLUNO

The Passo Mauria climbing area is a relatively small wall sitted just above Lorenzago di Cadore.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

Passo Mauria Climbing Guide

REGION Veneto
PROVINCE Belluno
GEOGRAPHY Lorenzago di Cadore
BEST TIME OF YEAR
all year
ROCK limestone
NUMBER OF ROUTES
30
RANGE OF GRADES
from 6b to 8b
HEIGHT 15-30m

routes

From left to right

Senza nome 7c
Senza nome 7b+
Senza nome 7b
Senza nome 7a
La rampa 6b
Senza nome  
Pusir 7c+
Cavalieri di pietra 7c
Ludwig II 8b
Ya yoga 8a
Kuip 7c+
Senza nome 8a+
Hata yoga 8a+
Conte Pugliè 7b+
Rocco Ciandon 7c
Idolatria 8a+
Chan tzu 8a
Il dubbio 7c+
La prua 8a
Senza nome  
Mirko 7b
Carmen 7a
Senza nome  
Senza nome 7a+
Senza nome 7c+
I Manonegra 8a
Senza nome  
Senza nome 6c
Senza nome 6c

Passo Staulanza | Dolomites

PASSO STAULANZA | DOLOMITES

Passo Staulanza, Dolomites

Passo Staulanza, sits at an elevation of 1773m. above the sea level, it is a high mountain pass located in the Italian Dolomites.  Passo Staulanza (or Forcella Staulanza) is part of the Belluno Province in the Veneto Region in northeast Italy. The Passo Staulanza connects the southern valley of Zoldo with the Cadore valley in the north, as well the pass separates  Mount Coldai (2.395m) of the Civetta Mountain Group with Monte Pelmo (3.168m), ofPelmo Mountain Group.  There are good facilities in the villages leading up to the Pass but at the summit of the pass there is only one Rifugio.

Passo Staulanza is part of the classic bike tour routes of the Dolomites.  The Giro d'Italia has crossed over the pass several times as a transition to other classic climbs. 

Passo Staulanza also sits on the Alto Vie 1 trail, an upper mountain multi-day trail in the Italian Dolomites.  Both the Civetta Mountain Group to the west and the Pelmo Mountain Group to the east offer great hikes and several classic Alpine climbs.

Passo Staulanza Dolomites

GETTING TO PASSO STAULANZA, ITALIAN DOLOMITES -Passo Staulanze is located along state road 251, which runs from the town of Longarone (just north of Belluno and along the train line), to Selva di Cadore.  The road is surprising large and well maintained, and since it an upper mountain road there are no large trucks and traffic is mild on most days. 

You can reach the Passo Staulanza using the local bus service. 

If you are bike touring the area you can either start you day off by utilizing the train to reach Longarone and then riding northwest toward Done and then up to Passo Staulanza.  After Passo Staulanza descend down to Selva di Cadore where you can either continue to descend to Alleghe or climb Passo Giau and descend down to Cortina d'Ampezzo. 

If you riding from Alleghe you can ride south to Agordo then climb Passo Duran over to the town of Dont and then climb the Passo Staulanza.  The best ride is from Dont up to Passo Staulanza.

Passo Staulanza from Dont Bike Climb | Dolomites

PASSO STAULANZA FROM DONT BIKE CLIMB | BIKE TOURING DOLOMITES

Passo Staulanza, Italian Dolomites

Bike Touring Forcello Staulanza or Passo Staulanzafrom Dont or Forno di Zolo is one the classic bike climbs in the Italian Dolomites.  The climb has been part of the Giro d'Italia multiple times and is used mainly as a transition climb to get to alternate valleys and climbs.  This is a great climb to warm up your legs before tackling  Passo Giau or Passo Fedaia, or a secondary climb after you have finished Passo Duran.  

WHAT TO EXPECT ON THE CLIMB

Cycling from Dont to Passo Staulanza is not a difficult climb but the ever changing percent of grade makes it difficult to get a good rhythm going during your ride.

If you are only riding Passo Staulanza you can get by with a compac and rear cog up to 25.  If you are riding a 53/39 you should have at least a 26 or 27, since there is an 11% max grade. 

PASSO STAULANZA FROM DONT BIKE TOUR ROUTE NOTES

Passo Staulanza, Bike Tour

REGION Veneto Region
PROVINCE Belluno Province
MOUNTAIN GROUP
START POINT Dont
ELEVATION AT START 926 meters a.s.l.
MAXIMUM ELEVATION 1775 meters a.s.l.
LENGTH 12.4 km
ELEVATION GAIN 849 meters
AVERAGE GRADE 7.9%
MAXIMUM GRADE 10.2%
AVERAGE TIME TO RIDE 1:00 hours

THE PASSO STAULANZA CYCLE ROUTE

Passo Staulanza, Italian Dolomites

At the final section of the Passo Duran descend you will intersect with State Road 251, turning right following the sign toward Passo Staulanza.  This first section is actually the hardest part of the 15 km climb. 

Passo Staulanza

The road up to Passo Staulanza is nice and wide, there is traffic so be careful and maintain your line during the ride.

Passo Stualanza

At the 3 km mark you will pass through the town of Fusine and Zoldo Alto. You will have a great view of the Civetta Mountaina Group and the Cordo di Lago Mountains on your left. During this part you will never exceed 8% grade but the elevation keeps changing, as mentioned before it is hard to find a rhythm but you will want to stay relaxed and not burn out your legs. 

Passo Staulanza

During the ride you will have two sections that flatten out a moment, one after Pecolo and then the other after Palavavere, these are great places to make up some time.  You will also get your first glace at the Monte Pelmo Mountain Group, that sits on the eastern side of the Pass.

Passo Staulanza

After Palavavere you will have a few gradual switchbacks to climb, giving you an insight to the great engineered roads throughout the Italian Dolomites.  From here you are only a short distance from the actual Pass.

Passo Staulanza

After the switchbacks you will have a nice gradual section where you can make up some time you have a face descend after the pass.  If you are just starting your day I would descend down to Selva di Cadore where there is a fountain in front of the church, to refill water bottles, or a couple of bars to make a bathroom or cafe stop, before continuing on to Passo Duran, Alleghe, Arabba, or Passo Fedaia.  If you have already completed Passo Duran this is not a bad place to stop for a bit to eat.  The rifugio Staulanza has good quality food. 

Passo Tre Croci from Cortina d'Ampezzo Bike Climb

PASSO TRE CROCI FROM CORTINA BIKE CLIMB | BELLUNO PROVINCE

tre croci cortina

  • START: Cortina d'Ampezzo
  • FINISH: Passo Tre Croci
  • LENGTH: 8.10 km
  • START ELEVATION: 1230 a.s.l. meters
  • FINISH ELEVATION: 1805 a.s.l. meters
  • ELEVATION GAIN: 575 meters
  • AVERAGE GRADE: 7.1%
  • MAX GRADE: 12%

Passo Valles from Falcade Alto Bike Climb

PASSO VALLES FROM FALCADE ALTO BIKE CLIMB | BELLUNO PROVINCE

passo valles facale

  • START: Falcade Alto
  • FINISH: Passo Valles
  • LENGTH: 7.3 km
  • START ELEVATION: 1395 a.s.l. meters
  • FINISH ELEVATION: 2033 a.s.l. meters
  • ELEVATION GAIN: 638 meters
  • AVERAGE GRADE: 8.7%
  • MAX GRADE: 14%

Piave Cheese from the Belluno Province

PIAVE CHEESE | BELLUNO PROVINCE

Piave cheese is an Italian cow's milk cheese, that is named after the Piave river. As Piave has a Protected Designation of Origin (Denominazione di Origine Protetta or DOP), DOP - Piave Cheese Consortium: The consortium overseeing the use of the name Piave the only "official" Piave is produced in the Dolomites area, province of Belluno, in the northernmost tip of the Veneto region.

Piave Cheese Consortium Piave is a hard, cooked curd cheese, offered at 5 different ages:

  • Piave Fresco (20 to 60 days aging - blue label)
  • Piave Mezzano (61 to 180 days aging - blue label)
  • Piave Vecchio (more than 6 months aging - blue label)
  • Piave Vecchio Selezione Oro (more than 12 months aging - red label)
  • Piave Vecchio Riserva (more than 18 months aging - black label).

Piave cheese has a dense texture, without holes, and is straw-yellow in hue. It has a slightly sweet flavor. Once fully aged, it becomes hard enough for grating, and it develops an intense, full-bodied flavor. Piave's rind is impressed repeatedly in vertical direction with the name of the cheese. How - Piave Cheese Consortium Piave is sold throughout Europe and even in the US as a hard cheese at which point its taste resembles that of a young Parmigiano Reggiano. The red label is aged at least 1 year and is called Vecchio (Piave Vecchio Selezione Oro), while the blue label is softer. Both are available all over Europe and can also be found in the US, primarily at specialty shops.

Pieve di Cadore, Belluno Province

PIEVE DI CADORE | BELLUNO PROVINCE

Pieve di Cadore. This town of Roman origin has an outstanding literary and artistic tradition. It's claim to fame is being the birthplace of Titian and the artist's house, which is still standing, is now a museum. There is also a painting by Titian in the parish church (Madonna and child with Saints Titian and Andrew and Titian himself as Donator).

The town is clustered around what might justifiably be considered the parliament of Cadore. Palazzo delia Magnifica Comunita, built in 1525. Today it houses historical and patriotic reminders of the city and important early-Venetian finds uncovered in the excavations at Lagole. There is also an odd "museum of eyeglasses" which reviews the history of glass where and there are also many eyeglasses factories in the vicinity.

Podenzoi Campo sportivo sector | Climbing Belluno Province

PODENZIO CAMPO CLIMBING AREA | BELLUNO

Podenzoi sector is sitted near Longarone. There are about 40 routes form level 6b to 8b which requre a good tecnique and finger strenght.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

Podenzoi Climbing Guide

REGION Veneto
PROVINCE Belluno
GEOGRAPHY Longarone
BEST TIME OF YEAR
from April to November
ROCK limestone
NUMBER OF ROUTES
40
RANGE OF GRADES
from 6b to 8b
HEIGHT 20-25m

routes

From right to left

I Vatussi 6b
Senza nome 6b
Senza nome 6b
Senza nome 6b
Vibratore a pedali 7b
Morfologica 7a+
Il cassonetto 6b+
Fantasilacqua 6c+
Acquasplash 6b+
Acquarium 6b
Madame de granfal 7a+
Bazar gruppe 7a+
Shock terapie 7b+
Canna rognosa 7b+
Manettoni 7b+
Boja chi molla 7c
Le fatiche di Tantalo 7c
Cara ti amo 7c
Mezzo sigaro 7a
Fetonte 6c
Wally Bully 7a+
Vestivamo all'albanese 6c
Le baccalanti 6c+
Sorpesa finale 7a+
Ti odio Mozambico 7a+
Attilio spezzato 7a+
Retromarcia violenta 6c+
Cannabis 6c
Dirty climb 6c+
Senza nome 7b
Cesarino 8a+
Demian 8b
Killerfingers 8a
Lavori in corso 8a+
Franz Von Gulash 7c+
Microcaccole 8a
Beato Pierino 8a+
Sintetica 8a
Boletus satana 7b+
Girellik 7c

Ponte al piè della Merendera sector | Climbing Belluno Province

PONTE AL PIE DELLA MERENDERA CLIMBING AREA | BELLUNO

The Merendera sector is just below Val Frisòn, and it's perfect to escape from the big climbing areas. In the area there are also many galleries that you can explore if you bring a flashlight.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

Merendera Climbing Guide

REGION Veneto
PROVINCE Belluno
GEOGRAPHY S.Stefano di Cadore
BEST TIME OF YEAR
from April to October
ROCK ldolomite
NUMBER OF ROUTES
23
RANGE OF GRADES
from 5b to 7c+
HEIGHT 15-25m

routes

From left to right

Potenza umana 6a
Occhio di falco 6b+
Manie bizzarre 6a+
Low time 6b
Gioventù bruciata 6b+
Biancaneve 6c+
Asterix 7a+
David gnomo 7a+
Zig zag 7b
Ac/Dc 6c+
Sole rosso 7b+
Bella storia 7a+
Boomerang 6c
Avventura 6a+
Batman 6a
Ferragosto'89 6a
La scelta 5b
Disperazione 6a
Troppe weizen 6a+
Hells bells 6b
Nuvola bianca 6c
Tiramisù 7b
Roxette 7a+

Rock Climbing Guide to the Belluno Province, Italy

BELLUNO PROVINCE ROCK CLIMBING GUIDE

Belluno is all mountains and home to the Dolomiti, so you would think there would be lots of great rock climbing.  There is a good variety of climbing available, but bolted sport climbs are not as abundant as you would thing.  Since many of the valley are still isolated by being tourist locations there are not enough people frequenting the area to fully develop the rock.  Given also that purest of the classic alpine style still exists, and they impede the develop at times.

ROCK CLIMBING SITES IN THE BELLUNO PROVINCE

  1. Rock Climbing Guide to Cinque Torre, Belluno
  2. Rock Climbing Guide to Colmirano, Belluno
  3. Rock Climbing Guide to Fanzaso, Belluno
  4. Rock Climbing Guide to Farenzena, Belluno
  5. Rock Climbing Guide to Sassi di Mas, Italy
  6. Rock Climbing Guide to Taibon, Belluno
  7. Rock Climbing Guide to Valle di Schievenin, Belluno
  8. Rock Climbig Guide to Crepe Basse, Belluno
  9. Rock Climbig Guide to Crepe d'Oucher, Belluno
  10. Rock Climbig Guide to Ponte al piè della Merendera, Belluno
  11. Rock Climbig Guide to Laggio Alta, Belluno
  12. Rock Climbig Guide to Passo Mauria, Belluno
  13. Rock Climbig Guide to Val d'Oten, Belluno
  14. Rock Climbig Guide to Podenzoi Campo sportivo, Belluno
  15. Rock Climbig Guide to Igne, Belluno
  16. Rock Climbig Guide to Sassi di Ronch, Belluno
  17. Rock Climbig Guide to Mesaroz, Belluno
  18. Rock Climbig Guide to Sasso di Caleda, Belluno

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sassi di Ronch sector | Climbing Belluno Province

SASSI DI RONCH CLIMBING AREA | BELLUNO

Sassi di Ronch sector sits near Laste. There are many routes between 4a and 8a+. You should try a visit.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

SASSI DI RONCH CLIMBING GUIDE

REGION Veneto
PROVINCE Belluno
GEOGRAPHY Laste
BEST TIME OF YEAR
From May to October
ROCK dolomite
NUMBER OF ROUTES
55
RANGE OF GRADES
from 4a to 8a+
HEIGHT 10-30 meters

LISTING OF ROUTES

From right to left

Ombrello al titanio 6b+
Senza nome 7a
Pippo alla tavola rotonda 6a+
Senza nome 6c
Senza nome  
Articulation 6c+
Ambra 7b+
Senza nome  
Attento al buco 8a+
Hortensio  
Atto rifatto 7b+
Perfetta 8a
La nera 7c
Premier 7c
Ornellina 7b+
Senza nome 7b
Ballando coi climbers 6c
Variante 6b+
Mr. Mojo Rising 7a
Senza nome 5a
Senza nome 5a
Donne lunatiche 6b
Senza nome 7a
Senza nome 7b
King lizard 6a
Dedalo 4a
Icaro 6b
Diedro 6b
Senza nome 7a
Senza nome 7c
Senza nome  
Senza nome 6b
Senza nome 6b+
Senza nome  
Senza nome  
Naneddu meo 6c+
Laste for ever 7a
Rilancio al buio 7b
Laste sfuggenti 6b
Oceano di solitudine  
Senza nome  
Cooperativa climb 7b
Senza nome  
Senza nome  
Rudy 7a+
Level group 7a
Tiranno Sergio 7c
Laste rock 7c+
Senza nome 7c+
Senza nome 7b+
Zapping 7b+

Sasso di Caleda-Pera sector | Climbing Belluno Province

SASSO DI CALEDA-PERA CLIMBING AREA | BELLUNO

Caleda-Pera sector is surrounded by a small field and from it flows spring water. The routes are well manteined, so help to keep them clean.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

Sasso di Caleda Rock Climbing Guide

REGION Veneto
PROVINCE Belluno
GEOGRAPHY Agordo
BEST TIME OF YEAR
summer
ROCK dolomite
NUMBER OF ROUTES
28
RANGE OF GRADES
from 6a to 8a
HEIGHT 10-20m

routes

From left to right

Raspa climb ?
Il ritorno di Sergio 7a+
Makonde 7b
Baboska 7b
Donna Diavolo 7a
Jenna 7b
Donald Duck 7b+
Dolomia Tremulis 7a+
Miss Caleda 7c+
Stati di agitazione 6c+
Ivan Desinovich 6c+
El Cumbre 6c
Buena suerte 6b+
Olof 7a+
Soweto 6c+
Garibaldi zoo 6c+
Stanislao Mowlinski 6b
Niagara 6a
Pentarello 6b
Senza nome ?
Acida ?
Uomo finito 6a
Calcolo numerico 6b
Crimini del cuore 6c
Stone Haven 7a+
La minorenne 7a+
Ecce Homo 7b+
Ghisao 8a

Sisilla-Due Sorelle sector | Climbing Vicenza Province

SISILLA-DUE SORELLE CLIMBING AREA | VICENZA

sisilla rock climbing area

The Sisilla-Due Sorelle sector is located at Passo Campogrosso in the Piccolo Dolomites.  The area is a great summer destination and a nice travel stop when moving from the Vicenza Province over to the Trento Province.  The rock style is similar to many of the classic Dolomite areas, and has been a training area for upper elevation climbs.  There are several multi pitch routes to enjoy all with an easy walk off on the back side of the cliff. Perfect area in summer, not crowded, with plenty of climbs for any level.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

Sisilla ROCK Climbing Guide

REGION Veneto
PROVINCE Vicenza
GEOGRAPHY Recoaro
BEST TIME OF YEAR
from April to October
ROCK Dolomite
NUMBER OF ROUTES
45
RANGE OF GRADES
from 5a to 7c+
HEIGHT 10-120m

routes at sisilla climbing area

Sisilla climbing sketch Campogrosso

From left to right

Sisilla:

Gulp 7b
Splash 6c
Biss Rock '89 7c+
Manhattan 6b
Bronx 6c+
Soobidoo 6c
Diretta soldà 6a+
Sabana grande 6c
Bombemont 7b
Buon pane del Menotti 6c+
Perchè 7c
Belzebù 7b+
Fessura solà 6c
L'ultimo rutto 7c
Frammenti di vita 7a+
Sbighibighilughiz 6b
Chernobyl 7c+
Sandri Carlesso 6a+
Sta 6c+
Hesperus 6a
Emanuela 7b
Vive una favola  
Bagliore al tramonto  
Coney Island 7a+
Thriller 7b+
Viavai 6b
Folletto vlante 6b+
Super folletto 7a+

Due sorelle:

El camin 5a
Bonsai 6b
Incastra la tecnica 6b
Nuvole  
El mugo  
Black face 6c
Nebbia 6a
Ameris 6b
Colonnina 6b+
Aia ai dii 6a+
Eppure soffia 6c
La cavalcata  
Spigolo soldà 6b
Caterina 6c
El querto  
El poro tordo  
Sola soletta  

Tre Cime di Lavaredo | Dolomites

TRE CIME DI LAVAREDO | ITALIAN DOLOMITES

Tre Cime di Lavaredo

The Tre Cime di Lavaredo ( Italian for "the three peaks of Lavaredo"), also called the Drei Zinnen (German, literally "three merlons"), are three distinctive battlement-like peaks, in the Sexten Dolomites of northeastern Italy. They are probably one of the best-known mountain groups in the Alps. The three peaks, from east to west, are:

  • Cima Piccola/Kleine Zinne ("little peak")
  • Cima Grande/Große Zinne ("big peak")
  • Cima Ovest/Westliche Zinne ("western peak").

The peaks are composed of well-layered dolostones of the Dolomia Principale (Hauptdolomit) formation, Carnian to Rhaetian in age, as are many other groups in the Dolomites (e.g., the Tofane, the Pelmo or the Cinque Torri). Until 1919 the peaks formed part of the border between Italy and Austria. Now they lie on the border between the Italian provinces of Bolzano (South Tyrol) and Belluno and still are a part of the linguistic boundary between German-speaking and Italian-speaking majorities.

The first ascent of the Cima Grande was on August 21, 1869, by Paul Grohmann with guides Franz Innerkofler and Peter Salcher. The Cima Ovest was first climbed exactly ten years later, on August 21, 1879, by Michel Innerkofler with G.Ploner, a tourist. The Cima Piccola was first climbed on July 25, 1881, by Michel and Hans Innerkofler. The routes of these three first ascents are still the normal ascent routes; the Cima Piccola's route is the most difficult of the three. Emilio Comici was the first to climb the north face of the Cima Grande in 1933 in a party of three, after an ascent time of 3 days and 2 nights. This partly overhanging northern face is considered by climbers to be one of the great north faces of the Alps.

Numerous routes lead from the surrounding communities to and around the peaks. The most common route is from Paternkofel/Monte Paterno to the alpine hut Auronzo at 2,333 m (7,654 ft), over Paternsattel (Patern Pass) to the alpine hut Dreizinnenhütte/Locatelli at 2,405 m (7,890 ft), and then to the peaks. There are a number of other routes as well. Since the front line between Italy and Austria during World War I ran through these mountains, there are a number of fortifications, man-made caves, and commemorative plaques in the area. Nearby communities include Auronzo di Cadore, Toblach/Dobbiaco, Sexten/Sesto, and the Puster Valley. The area has also staged many finishes in Giro D'Italia.

Val d'Oten sector | Climbing Belluno Province

VAL D'OTEN CLIMBING AREA | BELLUNO

Val d'Oten sector requires tecnique and explosive power. Perfect place in summer.

Please remember to respect the area and buy a local guide book.

Val d'Oten Climbing Guide

REGION Veneto
PROVINCE Belluno
GEOGRAPHY Calalzo di Cadore
BEST TIME OF YEAR
summer
ROCK dolomite
NUMBER OF ROUTES
40
RANGE OF GRADES
from 6b to 8b+
HEIGHT 25m

routes

From left to right

Anonima 7b
Incubo della ragione 7b
Spigus 7b
Variante Spigus 7b
Help 6c
Epitaffio per un bassotto 6c
Senza nome ?
Senza nome ?
Senza nome ?
Senza nome ?
Pilastro 6b+
Sofegaso 7b
Vespa 7b
Senza nome 7a+
La via della perdizione 7a+
Meteo 7b+
6c 6c
Diedro 7a+
Frice 6c
Digitale 7b
Senza nome ?
Senza nome ?
Nanni paia 7c+
Sisto pizzo 6b
Senza nome  
Fort Knox 8a+
Soft 8a
No ice 7c+
Dolomitica 6c
Hemmental 7b
Bubbonica 7b
Senza nome  
La Bella e la Bestia 8a+
Cliptonite 7c+
Meneghite 7c
Gi Pazzo 7b
Toni scaia 6b
Riscia 7b

Where to Eat in the Belluno Province

WHERE TO EAT IN THE BELLUNO PROVINCE

Foods of the Belluno Province

GREAT SLOW FOOD LOCATIONS

Slow Food restaurants in the Belluno Province of Veneto Italy.

Town Location

Canale d’Agordo

Alle Codole

Via XX Agosto, 27

Tel – 0437-590396

Pieve D’Alpago

Carota

Rifugio Carota

Località Carota, 2

Tel – 0437-478033

Seren del Grappa

San Siro

San Siro

Via San Siro, 8 A

Tel – 0439-44628

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