International Mountain Rescue Signals

INTERNATIONAL MOUNTAIN RESCUE SIGNALS

International mountain rescue signals are still the same today as they were in the past, and often the only means possible in the immensity of the mountains is sending an visual or acoustic signal 6 times per minute, at regular intervals, i.e. every 10 seconds. Pause for a minute and repeat the same signal until you receive a response. This is done three times in a minute, every 20 seconds, in a visual or audible way.

By acoustic signals, we mean shouting or whistling or any other perceptible noises; by visual signals we mean waving handkerchiefs, items of clothing or mirror signals; at night you can use a torch or, if possible, a fire (obviously with caution, especially if you are in a wooded area or a wooden shelter).

The ever more frequent use of helicopters by Mountain Rescue has rendered new signaling methods necessary. Coloroful sleeping bags or anoraks spread out on the ground, smoke signals or marks in the snow can aid location from above. The SOS rescue sign can be made with letters of about 2m long, using contrasting stones placed on the ground, or footprints in the snow. In order to be seen from above, i.e. by helicopter, you need to make the following signals with your arms or with lights at night:

mountain rescue signals


When giving the helicopter instructions to land, keep the following in mind: with arms outspread, remain still at the edge of the landing place; where possible the area surrounding the landing place should be clear of obstacles up to a space of 20x20 meters.

SPECIAL NOTE! Don’t move away until the rotor blades have stopped: you are an important fixing point for the pilot. Any items of clothing laid on the floor to help the pilot should be held down with stones to protect against the strong airflow given off by the helicopter’s blades!

Piccolo Dolomites Mountains

PICCOLO DOLOMITES | ITALY

Piccolo Dolomites, Italy

A small group of Peaks that sit above the town of Schio in the Vicenza Province. The group is made up of Pasubio, Craega, Cornetto and Cinque Croce. The peaks are just over 200 meters and have the same rugged shape, with individual towers, like the Dolomites. Thus, they get their name as a smaller version of the Dolomiti. The area was part of the Italian Front during WWI with some intense fighting occurring. Ernest Hemingway was sent to the Red Cross section in Schio when he first arrived in Italy to support the Army Group making attacks on this front.

The Piccolo Dolomiti and Recoaro Mille act as a crown to Recoaro Terme and include the groups of Carega, Sengio Alto, and Pasubio. The tourist attractions in this zone are also outstanding (climbing, excursions, summer and winter vacations, snow sports). The plateau of Tonezza del Cimone and the Fiorentini, which is still in the Vicentine area, is crossed by easy new roads; a new residential zone is being built on the Fiorentini; the beautiful snowfields of the zone of Toraro, Campomolon, and Melegnon are being equipped with modern tow equipment.

PICCOLO DOLOMITE MOUNTAIN GROUP

TOWNS NEAR THE PICCOLO DOLOMITES

  • Schio
  • Folgaria
  • Rovereto
  • Recoaro Terme
  • Lavarone

PRIMARY PEAKS OF THE PICCOLO DOLOMITES

BIKE TOUR ROUTES IN THE PICCOLO DOLOMITES

  • Passo Campogrosso
  • Pian d. Fuguzze
  • Passo Bocolo
  • Passo Coe

VIE FERRATE IN THE PICCOLO DOLOMITES

  • Sentiero alpinistico Cesare Battisti
  • vie ferrata Carlo Campaiani
  • vie ferrata Gaetano Falcipieri

RIFUGIO (MOUNTAIN HUTS IN THE PICCOLO DOLOMITES)

 

The Julian Alps in Italy

JULIAN ALPS | ITALY

julian alps italy

The Julian Alps are a mountain range of the Southern Limestone Alps that stretch from northeastern Italy to Slovenia, where they rise to 2,864 m at Mount Triglav, the highest peak in Slovenia and of the former Yugoslavia. They are named after Julius Caesar, who founded the municipal of Cividale del Friuli at the foot of the mountains. A large part of the Julian Alps is included in Triglav National Park. The second highest peak of the range, the 2,775m high Jôf di Montasio, lies in Friuli Venezia Region of Italy. The Julian Alps cover an estimated 4,400 km² (of which 1,542 km² lies in Slovenia). They are located between Sava valley and Kanalska Dolina. They are divided into the Eastern and Western Julian Alps.

Eastern Julian Alps

The Eastern Julian Alps are located in Slovenia. There are many peaks in the Eastern Julian Alps over 2,000m high, and they are mainly parts of ridges. The most important peaks are visible by height and massiveness. There are high plains on the eastern border like Pokljuka, Mežakla and Jelovic.

Western Julian Alps

The Western Julian Alps cover a much smaller area, and are located mainly in Italy. Only the Kanin group lies in Slovenia. The main peaks by height are:

  • Jôf di Montasio
  • Jof Fuart
  • Kanin

Important passes of the Julian Alps are:

  • The Vršič Pass, 1,611 m (5,826 feet), links the Sava and Soča valleys. It is the highest mountain road pass in Slovenia.
  • The Predil Pass (links Villach via Tarvisio and Bovec to Gorizia), paved road 1,156 m (3,792 feet)
  • The Hrušica Plateau at the Postojna Gate: (links Ljubljana to Gorizia), paved road 883 m (2,897 feet)
  • The Pontebba Pass (links Villach via Tarvisio and Pontebba to Udine), railway, paved road, 797 m (2,615 feet)