DUINO | TRIESTE PROVINCE

durino

Duino is a town and castle at the Adriatic coast in the municipality (comune) of Duino-Aurisina, part of the region of Friuli–Venezia Giulia in the province of Trieste, northeastern Italy. The two Duino castles are the main attraction. The older castle, dating back to the 11th century and which belonged to the patriarchy of Aquileia, is in ruins, while the newer Duino Castle dates back to 1389, is inhabited to this day and can be visited by tourists. Below the ruins of the ancient castle there lies a white rock projecting into the sea, the Dama Bianca, which resembles a veiled woman and gave origin to many gothic legends.

Trieste Province,

SISTIANA | TRIESTE PROVINCE

sistiana

Sistiana (Slovene: Sesljan) is a town in the Trieste Province of the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, in the far northeast of Italy near the Slovene border. It is a frazione of the comune of Duino-Aurisina. The village lies north-west of Trieste. The name is derived from the Latin Sextilianum, which may represent the first Roman settlement in the region of Trieste. A Roman villa has been discovered nearby, and the local quarries were exploited in the 2nd century AD. There were border clashes in the 16th century between the lords of Duino and the city of Trieste.

Trieste Province,

MONFALCONE | TRIESTE PROVINCE

monfalcone

Monfalcone (in the local Bisiac dialect: Mofalcòn) is a town and comune of the province of Gorizia ( Friuli-Venezia Giulia, northern Italy), located on the coast of the Gulf of Trieste. Monfalcone means "Mount of Falcon" in Italian. It is a major industrial centre for manufacturing ships, airplanes, textiles, chemicals and refined oil. It is the home of Fincantieri Cantieri Navali Italiani.

Monfalcone is the fifth most populous town in Friuli - Venezia Giulia and the main centre of Bisiacaria territory. Joined to its neighbourhoods, it reaches about 50,000 inhabitants. The town lies between the Carso hills and the Adriatic Sea, being the northernmost port of the Mediterranean Sea.

BATTLES OF WWI

WHAT TO SEE IN MONFALCONE

  • Rocca (Castle). Of medieval origin (according to a legend, it was founded by Theoderic the Great, King of the Ostrogoths), its current appearance dates to the Venetian restorations in the early 16th century. The interior houses a speleology exhibition.
  • Park of World War I
  • Karst (Carso) area
  • Cathedral of Sant'Ambrogio

Trieste Province,, WW1,

MUGGIA | TRIESTE PROVINCE

muggia

Muggia, Trieste Province in the Friuli Venezia Region of Italy, (Friulian: Mugle, Venetian: Muia)) is an Italian comune in the extreme south-east of the province lying on the border with Slovenia. Muggia rests on the last stretch of Istria still within Italian territory, after the dissolution of the Free Territory of Trieste in 1954 ceded the bulk of Istria to then Yugoslavia (now divided between Slovenia and Croatia). Its territory, limited on the sea-side by a shoreline of more than featuring a coastal road and on the border side by a hill system, Monti di Muggia, including Mt. Castellier, Mt. S. Michele, Mt. Zuc and Monte d'Oro, that dominate over a vast landscape of Italian and Istrian coast, is characterized by a rich sub-continental vegetation of both Carsic and Istrian type. It has a border crossing, known as San Bartolomeo, with Slovenia and the extreme west of the comune at Lazaretto. The Slovenian border crossing is called Lazaret in Koper municipality.

WHAT TO SEE IN MUGGIA

Muggia provides many evident traces of its Venetian traditions and origin, as showed by the dialect, the gastronomic traditions, the gothic-venetian style of some houses, the devious "calli", the loggias, the ogive arches, the ancient coats of arms on the façades but mostly the main square, a true Venetian "campiello". Memories of its early ages include an important pre-historic "castelliere" on Mt. Castellier (S. Barbara) and Roman (Archaeological Park of Castrum Muglae) and medieval remains in Muggia Vecchia (Old Muggia), once one of the guarding castles that in the 10th century were built to defend the Istrian border against the invasion of the Hungars. The Castle of Muggia, destroyed in 1353 by the Triestines, retains several remains of the previous period such as the ruins of the walls. A tower dating back to 1374 was due to the Patriarch of Aquileia Marquard of Muggia. Later in 1735, under the government of the Republic of Venice, it was restored, but it was totally abandoned during the following century. The Castle was restored by its current owners, the sculptor Villi Bossi and his wife Gabriella, and may be visited upon request. The most important art attraction is the little basilica of Santa Maria Assunta (10th-13th century), housing frescoes from the 14th-15th centuries.

 

Trieste Province,

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