mOLISE REGION OF ITALY

The Molise region's territory is nearly all mountainous (55% of the surface area) or hilly, with limited flat ground in the lower valleys and along the Adriatic coast; the Apennines divide Molise into isolated mountains and a chaotic array of hills, which stretch within a few kilometres of the coast, making communications difficult and creating a state of isolation.

The highest mountains are at the heart of the region and are part of `Samnite Apennine' (northern and eastern parts of Appennino Campano which the Bocca di Forlì (891 m.) separates from the Abruzzese Apennines) which include the southern extreme of the Meta mountains, here culminating at 2,185 m., the northern slope of the calcareous Matese massif (Mt. Miletto, 2,050 m.) and the Mount Mutria group; in addition, the Molise border passes the Apennine watershed, including the upper valley of the Volturno River, between the Mainardes and Matese.

Molise is perhaps the most repressed Italian region, from a tourist point of view. It is such a small area, and an insufficient communications network means isolation. Only in recent years has tourism here begun to expand and some small holiday resorts are trying to attract an increasingly larger clientele. These resorts include the mountain centres of Capracotta, Pescopennataro, Frosolone and Campitello Matese, already a well-known winter sports resort. On the Adriatic coast, with its wide, sandy beaches are seaside resorts such as: Petacciato Marina, Marino di Montanero, Campomarino and, especially, Termoli.

molise-region-map

Physcial Profile of the Molise Region

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OUTDOOR RECREATION IN THE MOLISE REGION

PROVINCES OF THE MOLISE REGION

Campobasso Province (regional capital) and Isernia Province

TOWNS IN THE MOLISE REGION

Campobasso – Capital of Molise, largest city in the region, home to a university, sights include a 15th century castle, 11th century churches, and 16th century cathedral
Isernia – City near Lazio border dating back to ancient Rome, historic center still based on ancient Roman city layout, sights include an archaeological excavation and a nearby village with ruins dating back to the 3rd and 4th centuries B.C.E.
Larino – Town in a mountain valley, heavily damaged in 2002 earthquake, historic center rebuilt faithfully, sights include a 1st century Roman amphitheatre and an 11th century cathedral
Termoli – Beach resort city, popular with vacationing Italians, home to a large Fiat plant, historic center faithfully restored after 2002 earthquake
Agnone – City near the Abruzzo border, historic artefacts found here date back to 3rd century B.C.E., sights include a museum at the Marinelli bell foundry (in business for more than 1,000 years, making it one of the world’s oldest companies)
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